Photos of Kīlauea's summit

A telephoto view showing a part of south sulfur bank on the south wall of Kīlauea caldera in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

Detailed Description

A telephoto view showing a part of south sulfur bank on the south wall of Kīlauea caldera in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The sulfur bank consists of lava flows that have been altered, mostly to sulfates, by acidic fumaroles. It was a prominent feature until the mid-19th century, when it was covered by lava flows filling the caldera. During Kīlauea's 2018 summit-collapse events part of the caldera floor dropped, exposing the sulfur bank, which is now one of the most prominent features along the wall of the caldera. Beyond the sulfur bank is a dark pāhoehoe flow erupted in September 1982. Between the pāhoehoe flow and the sulfur bank are explosive deposits erupted between about 1500 and the early 1800s. This photo was taken from Byron Ledge on October 9, 2020. USGS photo by Don Swanson.

Details

Image Dimensions: 4458 x 2664

Date Taken:

Location Taken: US