Lesson 15d: Markup Application

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Detailed Description

The Markup Application is a web-based mapping communication tool that allows users to suggest edits, or “markups”, to the National Hydrography Dataset, or NHD, Watershed Boundary Dataset, or WBD, and High Resolution National Hydrography Dataset Plus, or NHDPlus High Res.
 

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Image Dimensions: 1920 x 1080

Date Taken:

Length: 00:17:43

Location Taken: Augusta, ME, US

Transcript

The National Map is a collection of mapping products and services produced by the USGS National Geospatial Program.   The products and services are accessed via the internet through service calls and graphical user interfaces.  The National Geospatial Program has released a series of “how to” videos for people who are working with The National Map data and services.  The videos show how to use the services and interfaces to access data and tools for viewing, analyzing and printing geospatial data.   The training materials are a mixture of video and PowerPoint-based lessons.  Lessons 1 and 2 serve as an introduction to the training materials.  The remaining lessons are designed as quick “how to’s” and may be viewed as needed, in any order, depending on the user.

The Markup Application is a web-based mapping communication tool that allows users to suggest edits, or “markups”, to the National Hydrography Dataset, or NHD, Watershed Boundary Dataset, or WBD, and High Resolution National Hydrography Dataset Plus, or NHDPlus High Res. Anyone with a gmail account can suggest corrections and improvements to the data. In this lesson, I will provide a demonstration of the Markup Application and discuss the life cycle of the markups.

By the end of this lesson, you will be able to access and navigate the Markup Application, create and delete your markups, add and navigate reference layers in the application, and understand the life cycle of markups. The subsequent lesson goes over functionality of the Markup Reviewer tool - ArcGIS add-in tool used by the USGS and the NHD state stewards to review markups submitted through the web application

Before we access the application, it is important to note that Markup application has been designed to work only in Google Chrome web browser. Users also are required to login with a google account, which could be your administrative google account from a job or any gmail account.

The URL for the Markup Application is https://edits.nationalmap.gov/markup-app

 If you don’t want to remember this URL, search for “National Hydrography Dataset” and go to the home NHD page. Then go to “Tools”

Markup Application is the first tool listed on this page. Click the link.

Here you can click on access the “Markup App” link in the 3rd paragraph.

First Login into the application using your gmail account by clicking on the login tab in the left hand pane.

Now let’s go over the layout of application and different menu options.

Hovering over the layers icon in the top right corner of the window opens up a list of layers available for viewing. You can lock the view of this list by clicking on the “unlocked” link at the top of the layer list.

You get several basemap options listed at the top of the layer list. You also are able to view NHD, NHDPlus HR, WBD Lines, and WBD datasets.

NHD and NHDPlus HR layers become visible when you zoom the map to at least zoom level 13 or higher. You can find the zoom level at the bottom right corner of the map view.

In addition to the basemap and hydro layers, you have an option to view the layer of all markups submitted by any user or only your markups - these are the markups associated with your username in the database.

You are able to identify feature details in each layer using the identify toolbar in the top left corner of the map view.

Identify option works similar to ArcMap. You need to click on the feature in the map to view attribute details for this feature. For example, let’s get more details for an NHD Flowline. First, zoom in to an NHD Flowline feature. Using the identify toolbar, click on NHD and choose Flowline option. Make sure your NHD layer is turned on. Then click on a flowline feature on the map you would like to identify. Now you can view attribute information for this feature.

If you would like to continue with identifying features, simply click on another feature on the map. This action opens a new tab of attributes for the newly chosen feature and highlights the feature on the map.

When you are done with identifying details for a feature, you can simply close the attribute results window by clicking on the “x” in the top right corner of the attributes results window.

Now let’s take a look at the Markup navigation panel located on the left side of the view window.    

The first tab is called “Login tab” and it contains the user login information. 

The next tab is a search function. You are able to search by HUC number, by address or place, or coordinates in decimal degrees. Let’s search for a Bear Creek. In this instance, multiple results are returned and flagged on the map. If you meant to search for a Bear Creek in Colorado, scroll down to find the appropriate result and click “Zoom To”.

Now you are ready to create a markup for a feature of interest - in this example Bear Creek.

The next tab in the Markup Navigation panel is called “Markup tab”. This toolbar allows you to create a markup for a feature that already exists in one of the hydrography datasets; or you can create a markup to suggest a new feature to be added to one of the hydrography datasets. Let’s walk through an example of creating a markup for an existing feature. The workflow for creating a markup for a new feature is similar and is described in the Markup User guide.

Choose “Existing feature” in the workflow selection.

 Zoom the map far enough so that you are able to view the feature you would like to markup. Be sure the NHD layer is turned on in the layers list on the right side of the screen.

Now let’s say you would like to propose a geometry change for an existing NHD Flowline feature. Thus you would choose feature source as NHD in the markup tab.   Then choose flowline feature in the drop list of layer options and click “Start Identifying”.  Select the feature you would like to markup on the map. Now select the feature in the list of the identified results. In this example only one result was returned but it is possible that multiple results might be returned. In that case you have to select the one you are interested in.

 The next step is to select an action type you would like to use for the markup. There is an option to suggest only attribute changes, in which case you would check the box next to the “Modify attribute only”.  If you do that, the Issue type action automatically changes to “Comment Only” as no geometry changes are being suggested with the markup.

 Other Issue types are: update existing feature, delete feature, and comment only. You would choose “update existing feature” when you are proposing geometry changes. You would choose “delete feature” when you are proposing to remove an existing feature and you would chose comment only if you would like to note something else about the feature. A perfect example of a “comment only” would be to create a markup noting that the feature should flow in the opposite direction.

In our markup example we would like to propose a geometry change. Thus we will choose “Update Existing Feature” option for the action type. Click the “Select” button at the bottom of the markup window to continue.

 Now we choose a drawing tool. Since this is a markup for a flowline, I am going to choose Polyline to draw the markup. Using your mouse draw the new suggested line feature on the map and double click when finished the drawing.  Then click “Finish edit”.

 The next step is to populate the information for your markup and suggest any attribute changes if necessary. The attribute table is presented when the markup is completed.  Every markup is required to have a description field populated. It is important to provide a detailed description for your markup including any reference data you used to support your suggested change. The partner who will be validating your markups will be relying on the description field and available basemaps to make a decision on whether to accept or reject your markup. If he or she doesn’t have sufficient information to justify the change in front of them, they will not be able to accept the markup. This example is part of a markup lesson and I will fill out the description stating this and that no changes are necessary.

In some cases when you are proposing geometry changes to a feature, you may want to propose an attribute change at the same time. Click on the attribute that you would like to propose a change to. You will notice that some of the attribute fields are grayed out; and are not possible to be marked up. These fields get generated in the database and thus are impossible to change. Other attributes such as FTYPE and FCODE, can be suggested to be changed. Let’s say we would like to suggest to change this feature from a canal to a stream. The drop down menue under FTYPE shows the available change options. Choose StreamRiver.

 Once you filled out the description and suggested attribute changes, the markup is ready to be saved.

 Now let’s turn on Markup Layer in the layers list to make sure our markup was created successfully.

If we were to identify details of this markup you can see the username associated with the markup, reported date, that it was created for NHDFlowline with an action of Update Existing Feature. The issue description field contains the description we have provided and the AttributeData field contains suggested attribute changes.

Now let’s take a look at the rest of the tabs in the Markup navigation panel.

The next tab down is called “My History tab” This tab allows you to access that markups you have created in the past and delete them. This way if you have changed your mind about a markup or realized that you have made a mistake, you are able to remove the markup, and then re-create a new one. Let’s refresh the view since I just created a markup.  The markup we just created in showing in the list now. If I click on it I can view the details of the markup and the map view zooms to it. After reviewing the markup and confirming that I would like to change it, click “Delete.” This markup has been removed.

The next tab down is called “Add Services”. In some instances you may have a shapefile highlighting areas for you to markup, or another reference layer that you would like to use in your work when creating markups. This tab allows to add a web feature layer service to support your work. It has to be publicly accessible feature layer service. So you can use either a layer service that is already available or create a new one from the data on your machine. If you don’t have a way of creating a web feature layer service readily available to you, you can use a free ArcGIS online developer account to do so.

I already have feature layer service created that I would like to use for reference. This service layer highlights isolated network features in hydrologic region 6. Using this layer would allow me to identify area where I need to focus my attention and decide if new markup features need to be added to connect the network features.

Type in a service name that you would like to display in the list of layers. I have typed Isolated features R6 as the new service layer name.

Then copy and paste the URL for the service layer in the box below the “New Service Name”.

If the layer is added successfully, you will see it listed in the bottom of the list of available layers.

The layer also should be visible in the map view.

The service panel also allows you to navigate the features of the added service layer one at a time. In order to access individual features in the layer, select the service in the “Feature Services” window.  Then select at least one field, or up to two fields, that you would like to use to display individual feature information for this layer. For example, I would like to display the features based on their ObjectID, and FTYPE, Click “View Attributes” at the bottom of the service panel after selecting display options.

Now you can click one record at a time to zoom the map to it.

The service layer that you have added stays in the application only temporarily until you logout or refresh the URL. Thus no other users are able to view it. Refreshing the web browser will remove all added service layers. To remove a single layer, highlight it in the list of service layers and click Remove.

The last two tabs are reference tabs. The legend tab contains the legend for the layers available in the map viewer. For example, the NHD legend contains layers such as Point, Flow Direction, and Flow Line Large Scale.

The Help tab contains the link to the Markup User Guide. The User Guide contains step by step instructions on how to use the application, and some additional information on the markup workflow.

This link also contains a URL for more information NHD and WBD https://nhd.usgs.gov and a URL for more information on NHDPlus data https://nhd.usgs.gov/NHDPlus_HR.html. For any comments or questions related to this User Guide of Markup Application, please contact markup@usgs.gov.

Now that we know how to create markups, let’s talk about what happens to the markups after they get submitted and how do you know that anything has been done to resolve your markup. Every markup has a status field associated with it. This field gets updated as the markup goes through the validation and editing workflow. The color of the markup display changes in the application to reflect its status.

 Markups can come from anybody in the public through the web application. All markups get assigned the status “submitted”.

USGS editors, NHD and WBD state partners have access to another tool called Markup Reviewer. Markup Reviewer is a desktop tool in ArcGIS that allows reviewers to query markups submitted through the web application, view their details, and to change their status field appropriately. The subsequent lesson goes over the functionality of the Markup Reviewer tool.

USGS and State partners review submitted markups through Markup Reviewer tool. They use description field to decide if a suggested markup should be accepted.

If they determine a markup to be an invalid edit suggestion, they change the status field to “won’t fix”.

 If they determine a markup to be a valid edit suggestion, they change the status to “In Progress”.

 Markups changed to an “In Progress” status will next go into the editing workflow using USGS NHD and WBD editing tools. NHD and WBD partners use standalone tools to perform edits in NHD and WBD to ensure database integrity is maintained properly.

 Once the edits for a corresponding markup are completed in the NHD or WBD datasets, the editor will use the Markup Reviewer again to change the status field of the markup to “Resolved”.

In this lesson, we discussed how to access and navigate the Markup Application, create and delete your markups, add and navigate reference layers in the application, and understand the life cycle of markups. The subsequent lesson goes over the functionality of the Markup Reviewer tool - ArcGIS add-in tool used by the USGS and the NHD and WBD state stewards to review markups submitted through the web application.