Natural Hazards

Due to a lapse in appropriations, the majority of USGS websites may not be up to date and may not reflect current conditions. Websites displaying real-time data, such as Earthquake and Water and information needed for public health and safety will be updated with limited support. Additionally, USGS will not be able to respond to inquiries until appropriations are enacted.  For more information, please see www.doi.gov/shutdown

Filter Total Items: 282
Date published: December 14, 2018
Status: Active

Overview

Between the years 1973–2008, there was an average of 25 earthquakes of magnitude three and larger in the central and eastern United States. This rate ballooned to over 600 M3+ earthquakes in 2014 and over 1000 in 2015. Since 2015 the earthquake rate has declined significantly (364 M3+ earthquakes in 2017), but this is still much higher than the natural earthquake rate.

Date published: December 14, 2018
Status: Active

Myths and Misconceptions

What you do and don’t know about induced seismicity.

Date published: December 14, 2018
Status: Active

Observational Studies

The USGS is currently studying seismicity that may be induced at 6 locations across the United States. These studies involve earthquake monitoring, examining industrial data, and evaluating any relationships between seismicity and industrial actions.

Date published: December 14, 2018
Status: Active

Hazard Estimation

The USGS is currently developing new methods to evaluate the hazard due to induced earthquakes. These methods will account for the rapid changes in earthquake rate that we have witnessed in the past few years.

Date published: December 14, 2018
Status: Active

Numerical Modeling

The USGS uses numerical simulations of earth processes to: Evaluate the physical relationships between fluid injection and earthquakes at specific sites, and to simulate possible future behaviors of new and ongoing injection projects.

Date published: December 14, 2018
Status: Active

Publications

USGS publications on induced seismicity.

Date published: December 14, 2018
Status: Completed

Preliminary simulation of the 2010 tsunami in Indonesia

Preliminary simulation of the tsunami from the October 25, 2010 M=7.7 subduction zone earthquake offshore of the Mentawai Islands, Indonesia

Contacts: Eric Geist
Date published: December 12, 2018
Status: Active

Tribal Land Vegetation and Watershed Modeling

San Carlos Apache Reservation covers 1.8 million acres in east-central Arizona, and has diverse ecosystems and vegetation types that support a natural resource-based economy.

Contacts: Laura M Norman
Date published: December 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Journey Along a Fieldline

A comic book that introduces the basics of geomagnetism.
View the comic book (PDF).

Date published: November 28, 2018
Status: Active

Hurricane Sandy Response- Linking the Delmarva Peninsula's Geologic Framework to Coastal Vulnerability

The Delmarva Peninsula is a 220-kilometer-long headland, spit, and barrier island complex that was significantly affected by Hurricane Sandy. In order to better constrain controls on coastal vulnerability and evolution, the region’s sediment sources, transport pathways and sediment sinks must be identified. This project defines the geologic framework of the Delmarva coastal system through...

Date published: November 15, 2018
Status: Active

San Francisco Bay Area - East Bay (BALT1) Site near Castro Valley, CA

Recent Conditions

The instruments were installed in the spring of 2009 and are used to monitor and detect changes in local conditions.  Soil water content and ground water pressure are monitored at two nests on the same hillslope.  Data for the site include:

Contacts: Brian Collins
Date published: November 13, 2018
Status: Active

Using Video Imagery to Study Wave Dynamics: Isla Verde

Four video cameras overlook the coast at Isla Verde in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Two of them focus on the shoreline: Camera 1 looks at the nearby beach and eastward along the shore, and Camera 2 looks farther away to the eastern end of the beach. The other two look out across the reefs: Camera 3 to the north-northwest, and Camera 4 to the northeast.