Natural Hazards

Filter Total Items: 613
Date published: July 6, 2020
Status: Completed

Auroras and Earthquakes: Strange Companions

Release Date: JULY 6, 2020

In 1722 and 1723 a London clockmaker, George Graham, observed daily and consistent variations on one of his instruments, a “Needle upon the Pin” (a compass), for which he had no explanation. Swedish scientists obtained some of Graham’s instruments to record what is now known to be the variations in Earth’s magnetic field. In 1741, they noticed a significant...

Contacts: Adam Ringler, Ph.D., Lisa A Wald, Carl Tape
Date published: June 16, 2020
Status: Active

Coastal Change Hazards

Natural processes such as waves, tides, and weather, continually change coastal landscapes. The integrity of coastal homes, businesses, and infrastructure can be threatened by hazards associated with event-driven changes, such as extreme storms and their impacts on beach and dune erosion, or longer-term, cumulative...

Date published: June 5, 2020
Status: Active

Puerto Rico Landslide Hazard Mitigation Project

The USGS Landslide Hazards Program and the Natural Hazards Center have partnered with the University of Puerto Rico Mayagüez Geology Department to develop outreach materials on landslide hazards and shared resources and interdisciplinary expertise with a broad range of counterparts in Puerto Rico. 

Date published: May 29, 2020
Status: Completed

The Blind Zone of Earthquake Early Warning

Release Date: MAY 29, 2020

Residents in California, Oregon, and Washington have been told that earthquake early warning (EEW) is at their doorstep and will alert them to the shaking from an earthquake before it arrives. Some media reports have said there will be “up to a minute of warning”. The problem is, for onshore earthquakes these claims are exaggerated, and under some conditions a...

Date published: May 20, 2020
Status: Active

Numerical Models of the Physics Underpinning Induced Earthquakes

The USGS uses computer simulations to evaluate the physical relationships between fluid injection (or extraction) and earthquakes. We can only indirectly study these relationships using observations, so computer simulations help us gain a better physical understanding for the processes that are most likely causing these earthquakes. Scientists can also use such simulations to understand...

Date published: May 20, 2020
Status: Completed

Hazard Estimation for Induced Earthquakes

In 2016, 2017, and 2018, the USGS released ...

Date published: May 20, 2020
Status: Active

Observational Studies of Induced Earthquakes

In response to sudden changes in seismicity that are potentially induced by human activity, the USGS may deploy temporary seismic stations to better understand the earthquakes. These deployments typically consist of 2-15 seismometers placed in the immediate vicinity of the seismicity.

Date published: May 20, 2020
Status: Active

Myths and Misconceptions About Induced Earthquakes

Do you know the facts about induced earthquakes?

Date published: May 1, 2020
Status: Active

Offshore Faults along Central and Northern California

From Point Conception to Cape Mendocino, seafloor faults have been, in the past, mapped in varying ways and without enough detail to assess their earthquake potential. To provide this important information, USGS uses advanced technology to image offshore faults that could trigger devastating earthquakes near densely populated areas and a nuclear power plant.

Contacts: Janet Watt
Date published: April 29, 2020
Status: Active

Overview of Hazards and Risk Assessments

Landslide hazard and risk assessments help people understand the dangers from landslides to their towns and cities, homes, facilities, and businesses.  Landslide hazard assessments are estimates of the probability that landslides will affect a particular area or location, typically within a given timeframe.  

Date published: April 29, 2020
Status: Completed

Preliminary Landslide Assessments

The USGS seeks to provide effective situational awareness about long-term and ongoing hazardous events to improve emergency response, inform the public, and minimize societal disruption. Large, highly mobile landslides generate seismic signals that can be detected by seismic monitoring networks and leave scars and deposits that can be detected from high-resolution remote-sensing imagery....

Contacts: Jonathan Godt
Date published: March 19, 2020
Status: Active

Coastal Sediment Availability and Flux (CSAF)

Sediments are the foundation of coastal systems, including barrier islands. Their behavior is driven by not only sediment availability, but also sediment exchanges between barrier island environments. We collect geophysical, remote sensing, and sediment data to estimate these parameters, which are integrated with models to improve prediction of coastal response to extreme storms and sea-level...