Water Resources

Filter Total Items: 354
Date published: September 5, 2019
Status: Active

Peak-Flow Frequency Analysis for Selected Montana Streamgages

The Montana Department of Resources and Conservation requires peak-flow information for Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) floodplain mapping for various locations across Montana. Accordingly, the USGS WY-MT Water Science Center has published peak-flow frequencies for selected streamgages in the Beaverhead River, Clark Fork, Ruby, Jefferson and Madison River Basins, and for selected...

Date published: August 26, 2019
Status: Active

USGS Next Generation Water Observing System (NGWOS)

Substantial advances in water science, together with emerging breakthroughs in technical and computational capabilities, have led the USGS to develop a Next Generation Water Observing System (NGWOS). The USGS NGWOS will provide real-time data on water quantity and quality in more affordable and rapid ways than previously possible, and in more locations.

Date published: August 15, 2019
Status: Active

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Date published: August 14, 2019
Status: Active

Streamflow Information Program

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates and maintains a national network of about 8,000 streamgages (2018) to provide long-term, accurate, and unbiased streamflow information (often called discharge) to meet the multiple needs of many diverse users. Streamflow information is fundamental to national and local economic well-being, protection of life and property, and efficient and effective...

Date published: July 6, 2019
Status: Completed

Rain and Precipitation

Rain and snow are key elements in the Earth's water cycle, which is vital to all life on Earth. Rainfall is the main way that the water in the skies comes down to Earth, where it fills our lakes and rivers, recharges the underground aquifers, and provides drinks to plants and animals.

Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 28, 2019
Status: Completed

Water Meniscus

A meniscus is a curve in the surface of a molecular substance (water, of course) when it touches another material. With water, you can think of it as when water sticks to the inside of a glass.

Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 27, 2019
Status: Active

Urban Waters Federal Partnership Cooperative Matching Funds Projects

The Urban Waters Federal Partnership (UWFP) reconnects urban communities—particularly those that are overburdened or economically distressed—with their waterways by improving coordination among federal agencies.

Date published: June 27, 2019
Status: Active

Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Cooperative Matching Funds Projects

New projects from coast to coast will advance the research on harmful algal blooms (HABs) in lakes, reservoirs and rivers. The vivid emerald-colored algal blooms are caused by cyanobacteria, which can produce cyanotoxins that threaten human health and aquatic ecosystems and can cause major economic damage.

Date published: June 6, 2019
Status: Completed

Surface Tension and Water

Surface tension in water might be good at performing tricks, such as being able to float a paper clip on its surface, but surface tension performs many more duties that are vitally important to the environment and people. Find out all about surface tension and water here.

Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 4, 2019
Status: Active

Appalachian Basin Geologic Mapping Project

The Appalachian Basin Geologic Mapping Project performs geologic mapping at local and regional scales, and geologic research in The Valley and Ridge and Appalachian Plateaus physiographic provinces. These provinces include parts of 11 states and mainly borders the Blue Ridge / Piedmont and North Interior Lowlands Provinces. Two states have Valley and Ridge geology only (GA, NJ), two have...

Date published: May 23, 2019
Status: Completed

What is Hydrology?

"Hydro" comes from the Greek word for... water. Hydrology is the study of water and hydrologists are scientists who study water. Read on to learn more.

Attribution: Water Resources