Water Resources

Filter Total Items: 357
Date published: August 14, 2019
Status: Active

Streamflow Information Program

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates and maintains a national network of about 8,000 streamgages (2018) to provide long-term, accurate, and unbiased streamflow information (often called discharge) to meet the multiple needs of many diverse users. Streamflow information is fundamental to national and local economic well-being, protection of life and property, and efficient and effective...

Date published: July 30, 2019
Status: Active

Flaxville Aquifer

The Flaxville aquifer is present in the northern and central parts of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation and consists of sand and gravel that forms extensive plateaus and topographic benches used for dryland farming.  Because many residents rely on groundwater as their primary water supply on the Reservation, the Flaxville and underlying aquifers are important sources of groundwater.  The goal...

Date published: July 6, 2019
Status: Completed

Rain and Precipitation

Rain and snow are key elements in the Earth's water cycle, which is vital to all life on Earth. Rainfall is the main way that the water in the skies comes down to Earth, where it fills our lakes and rivers, recharges the underground aquifers, and provides drinks to plants and animals.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 28, 2019
Status: Completed

Water Meniscus

A meniscus is a curve in the surface of a molecular substance (water, of course) when it touches another material. With water, you can think of it as when water sticks to the inside of a glass.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 4, 2019
Status: Active

Appalachian Basin Geologic Mapping Project

The Appalachian Basin Geologic Mapping Project performs geologic mapping at local and regional scales, and geologic research in The Valley and Ridge and Appalachian Plateaus physiographic provinces. These provinces include parts of 11 states and mainly borders the Blue Ridge / Piedmont and North Interior Lowlands Provinces. Two states have Valley and Ridge geology only (GA, NJ), two have...

Date published: May 23, 2019
Status: Completed

What is Hydrology?

"Hydro" comes from the Greek word for... water. Hydrology is the study of water and hydrologists are scientists who study water. Read on to learn more.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: May 8, 2019
Status: Active

Historical Water-Use in Florida

The Florida Water-Use Program is an ongoing cooperative project between the United States Geological Survey (USGS), Caribbean-Florida Water Science Center and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS), Office of Agricultural Water Policy (http://www.freshfromflorida.com/Divisions-...

Date published: April 23, 2019
Status: Active

Brook trout vulnerability to drought: eastern component of USGS national integrated ecohydrological research and monitoring plans

There is a growing and urgent need to develop and implement innovative strategies to research, monitor, and manage freshwater resources as societal demands escalate simultaneously with climate-driven changes in water availability. Over the past several years, many regions have experienced extreme droughts, fueled by prolonged periods of reduced precipitation and exceptionally warm temperatures...

Date published: April 15, 2019
Status: Active

Fish locomotion and biomechanics as limiting and optimizing factors in fish passage

Swimming ability determines how well fish are able to access habitat, and is a fundamental design consideration for passing fish at dams, road crossings, etc.  The purpose of this study plan is to improve understanding of how fish are able to negotiate zones of high velocity and turbulent flow, such as are found in fishways, culverts, as well as in natural areas.   Swimming performance is...

Date published: April 1, 2019
Status: Active

Impacts of agricultural drainage on groundwater recharge

Artificial subsurface drainage is being increasingly utilized on agricultural land in southeast Minnesota. This region is underlain by thinner glacial deposits than are found in the historically drained areas of the State. Due to these thinner deposits, drainage in this area may have a greater impact on recharge to the underlying bedrock aquifers, a critical resource to the region.

Date published: March 7, 2019
Status: Active

Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program (MsCIP)

In 2009, the Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program (MsCIP) was developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Mobile District in conjunction with other Federal and State agencies, to help reduce future storm damage along the Mississippi Gulf Coast. The Comprehensive Plan for MsCIP includes restoring the Mississippi barrier islands and over 3,000 acres of wetland and coastal forest...