Water Resources

Filter Total Items: 371
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Rivers Contain Groundwater

Naturally, the water running in rivers comes from precipitation that runs off the landscape into the river. But since precipitation also seeps into (and moves) into the ground, you don't often consider that a significant amount of the water flowing in rivers comes from water in the ground seeping back "up" into the river from below. 

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Raindrops are Different Sizes

You've seen a light mist hanging in the air before. And you've had "full sized" water drops splash you in the face, too. So, raindrops are different sizes, but why? Find out below.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Are Raindrops Shaped Like Teardrops?

We all know that raindrops are shaped like teardrops, right? Actually, that is not true. Read on to find out the facts.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Water Color

Is pure water really clear? Not really—even pure water is not colorless, but has a slight blue tint to it. In the natural world you often see water that is definitely not clear. Sediment and organics color natural water shades of brown or green. And if too much iron in present, even your drinking water can have a brown hue. Read on to investigate water color in the environment.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Crest Gage: A Quick Way to Measure River Stage

The maximum height rivers reach during storms and floods is an important "data point" to document. In places where there are not dedicated monitoring equipment, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) often uses "crest stage gages" to record a one-time measurement of the flood peak.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Water Compressibility

Water is essentially incompressible, especially under normal conditions. Yet, in industrial applications water can be tremendously compressed and used to do things like cut through metal.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Groundwater Wells

Wells are extremely important to all societies. In many places wells provide a reliable and ample supply of water for home uses, irrigation, and industries. Where surface water is scarce, such as in deserts, people couldn't survive and thrive without groundwater, and people use wells to get at underground water.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Artesian Water and Artesian Wells

Artesian water is really not different from other groundwater, except for the fact that it flows to the land surface because pressure in the rocks underground force it to the surface. But, having water flow to the surface naturally is a handy way to tap groundwater resources.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Pharmaceuticals in Water

There is a growing concern about the occurance of pharmaceuticals in water bodies and in drinking water. Pharmaceuticals get into the water supply via human excretion and by drugs being flushed down the toilet. You might think wastewater treatment plants would take care of the situation, but pharmaceuticals pass through water treatment.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

The Story of Water in Dryville

Read on about our fictional tale of how YOU establish a new town in the desert and the role water plays in all aspects of the process.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Drought and Groundwater Levels

Groundwater decline is a real and serious problem in many places of the Nation and the world. When rainfall is less than normal for several weeks, months, or years, the flow of streams and rivers declines, water levels in lakes and reservoirs fall, and the depth to water in wells increases.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Water Dowsing

"Water dowsing" refers in general to the practice of using a forked stick, rod, pendulum, or similar device to locate underground water, minerals, or other hidden or lost substances, and has been a subject of discussion and controversy for hundreds, if not thousands, of years.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources