Water Resources

Filter Total Items: 371
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

High-Water Marks and Flooding

At places where the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) does not have real-time monitoring equipment, we use high-water marks to measure the maximum height (stream stage) of a flood or high-water event.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Hydroelectric Power: How it Works

So just how do we get electricity from water? Actually, hydroelectric and coal-fired power plants produce electricity in a similar way. In both cases a power source is used to turn a propeller-like piece called a turbine.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Heat Capacity and Water

Water has a high heat capacity—it absorbs a lot of heat before it begins to get hot. You may not know how that affects you, but the heat capacity of water has a huge role to play in the Earth's climate and helps determine the habitability of many places around the globe.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Three Gorges Dam: The World's Largest Hydroelectric Plant

The Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River in China is the world's biggest hydroelectric facility. 

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Hydroelectric Power: Advantages of Production and Usage

Nothing is perfect on Earth, and that includes the production of electricity using flowing water. Hydroelectric-production facilities are indeed not perfect (a dam costs a lot to build and also can have negative effects on the environment and local ecology), but there are a number of advantages of hydroelectric-power production as opposed to fossil-fuel power production.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 5, 2018
Status: Completed

Water Density

In practical terms, density is the weight of a substance for a specific volume. The density of water is roughly 1 gram per milliliter but, this changes with temperature or if there are substances dissolved in it. Ice is less dense than liquid water which is why your ice cubes float in your glass. As you might expect, water density is an important water measurement.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 5, 2018
Status: Completed

Capillary Action and Water

Plants and trees couldn't thrive without capillary action. Capillary action helps bring water up into the roots. With the help of adhesion and cohesion, water can work it's way all the way up to the branches and leaves. Read on to learn more about how this movement of water takes place.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 5, 2018
Status: Completed

Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD) and Water

You don't often think that water bodies contain oxygen, but water does contain a small amount of dissolved oxygen. A small amount, but it is essential for life in the water. Biological oxygen demand (BOD) generally represents how much oxygen is needed to break down organic matter in water.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 5, 2018
Status: Completed

Environmental DNA (eDNA)

Environmental DNA (eDNA) is organismal DNA that can be found in the environment. Environmental DNA originates from cellular material shed by organisms (via skin, excrement, etc.) into aquatic or terrestrial environments that can be sampled and monitored using new molecular methods. Such methodology is important for the early detection of invasive species as well as the detection of rare and...

Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 5, 2018
Status: Completed

Bacteria and E. Coli in Water

Water, like everything else on Earth, including you, is full of bacteria. Some bacteria are beneficial and some are not. Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria, found in the digestive tract of animals, can get into the environment, and if contacted by people, can cause health problems and sickness. Find out the details here.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 5, 2018
Status: Completed

Aqueducts Move Water in the Past and Today

An aqueduct has been and continues to be an imporant way to get water from one place to another. Be it 2,000 years ago in ancient Rome, Italy or today in California, aqueducts were and are essential to get water from a place where it exists in ample supply to where it is scarce. Find out how these "ancient marvels" work.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 5, 2018
Status: Completed

Adhesion and Cohesion of Water

Adhesion and cohesion are important water properties that affects how water works everywhere, from plant leaves to your own body. Just remember... Cohesion: Water is attracted to water, and Adhesion: Water is attracted to other substances.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources