Water Resources

Filter Total Items: 436
Date published: July 20, 2021
Status: Active

Karst Aquifers: Upper Floridan and Biscayne Aquifers

Covering approximately 100,000 square miles of the southeastern United States, the Floridan aquifer system (FAS) is one of the most productive aquifers in the world. The FAS is the primary source of drinking water for almost 10 million people, with nearly 50 percent of all water withdrawals being used for industrial purposes and agricultural irrigation.

Contacts: Allan K Clark
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: July 20, 2021
Status: Active

Karst Aquifers: Madison Aquifer

The Madison aquifer underlies eight states in the U.S. and Canada.  It is an important water resource in the northern plains states where surface water supplies are limited and population is increasing.  Declining water levels are a major issue for many of the communities that rely on this aquifer.

Contacts: Allan K Clark
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: July 20, 2021
Status: Active

Karst Aquifers: Midwest Paleozoic Carbonate Aquifers

The porosity of carbonate and dolomitic units in Midwest Paleozoic rocks has been enhanced by dissolution, and in many areas these rocks have undergone extensive karst development. This aquifer demonstrates karst features such as disappearing streams, springs, and caves.

Contacts: Allan K Clark
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: July 20, 2021
Status: Active

Karst Aquifers: New England Karst Aquifers

The New England Karst Aquifers feature crystalline limestones and marbles, narrow fissures, and some small caves.  

Contacts: Allan K Clark
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: July 20, 2021
Status: Active

Karst Aquifers: Ozark Plateau Karst Aquifers

The Ozark Plateaus aquifer system consists of two aquifers, the Springfield Plateau aquifer and the Ozark aquifer, and an intervening confining unit.  The system consists of mostly of carbonate rocks that are Cambrian through Mississippian in age.

Contacts: Allan K Clark
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: July 20, 2021
Status: Active

Karst Aquifers: Roswell Basin Aquifer

The Roswell Artesian Basin consists of an eastward-dipping carbonate aquifer overlain by a leaky evaporitic confining unit, overlain in turn by an unconfined alluvial aquifer. This aquifer provides habitat for several federally listed endangered invertebrate species.  Decades of intensive pumping have caused substantial declines in hydraulic head in the aquifer.  

Contacts: Allan K Clark
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: July 20, 2021
Status: Active

Karst Aquifers: Pacific Northwest Pseudokarst Aquifers

Pseudokarst features such as lava tubes, fissures, open sinkholes, and caves, are extensive in some regions of the west. Some of the largest regions with this type of pseudokarst are located in the Pacific Northwest, including the Snake River area of Idaho, part of the Columbia Basalt Plateau in Washington and Oregon, and in the lava fields of northeastern California. 

Contacts: Allan K Clark
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: July 20, 2021
Status: Active

Karst Aquifers: Valley and Ridge, Piedmont, and Blue Ridge Aquifers

The carbonate aquifers of the Appalachian Valley and Ridge Province, formed during Appalachian mountain building, have highly variable karst aquifer characteristics. The Valley and Ridge, Piedmont, and Blue Ridge Aquifers demonstrate karst features such as caves, sinkholes, sinking streams, and conduits.

Contacts: Allan K Clark
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: April 27, 2021
Status: Active

Integrated Water Science (IWS) Basins

The U.S. Geological Survey is integrating its water science programs to better address the Nation’s greatest water resource challenges. At the heart of this effort are plans to intensively study at least 10 Integrated Water Science (IWS) basins — medium-sized watersheds (10,000-20,000 square miles) and underlying aquifers — over the next decade. The IWS basins will represent a wide range of...

Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: April 27, 2021
Status: Active

Next Generation Water Observing System (NGWOS)

Substantial advances in water science, together with emerging breakthroughs in technical and computational capabilities, have led the USGS to develop a Next Generation Water Observing System (NGWOS). The USGS NGWOS will provide real-time data on water quantity and quality in more affordable and rapid ways than previously possible, and in more locations.

Date published: April 27, 2021
Status: Active

Integrated Water Availability Assessments (IWAAs)

The USGS Integrated Water Availability Assessments (IWAAs) are a multi-extent, stakeholder driven, near real-time census and prediction of water availability for both human and ecological uses at regional and national extents.

Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: April 27, 2021
Status: Active

USGS Streamgaging Network

The USGS Groundwater and Streamflow Information Program supports the collection and (or) delivery of both streamflow and water-level information at approximately 8,500 sites and water-level information alone for more than 1,700 additional sites. The data are served online—most in near realtime—to meet many diverse needs.

Attribution: Water Resources