Water Resources

Filter Total Items: 346
Date published: August 10, 2018
Status: Active

National Streamflow Information Program

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates and maintains a national streamgage network of about 8,000 streamgages (2018) to provide long-term, accurate, and unbiased streamflow information (often called discharge) to meet the multiple needs of many diverse users. Streamflow information is fundamental to national and local economic well-being, protection of life and property, and efficient and...

Contacts: Cory Angeroth
Date published: August 3, 2018
Status: Active

Changes in Water-Use Categories

Water-use terminology in the series of USGS water-use circulars, first published for the year 1950, has changed over time as illustrated here. Some categories were re-named but retained essentially the same definition, while other changes split existing categories or shifted components of one category to another. See the entries for these terms in the...

Date published: July 23, 2018
Status: Active

Flood Inundation Mapping Science

When planning for a flood, there are three key questions that must be answered: What areas will be flooded? How deep will the flood waters get? When will the flood arrive? Historical flooding can help a community anticipate how much impact similar flood events could have, but there are other methods and tools that can provide more accurate and nuanced estimations of a wide variety of...

Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: July 20, 2018
Status: Active

SWToolbox Software Information

USGS and EPA have combined their SWSTAT and DFLOW software programs into a new tool for the low flow anlaysis, the SWToolbox.

Contacts: SWToolbox Help
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: July 16, 2018
Status: Active

Flood Inundation Mapping (FIM) Program

Floods are the leading cause of natural-disaster losses in the U.S. More than 75 percent of declared Federal disasters are related to floods, and annual flood losses average almost $8 billion with over 90 fatalities per year. Although the amount of fatalities has declined due to improved early warning systems, economic losses continue to rise with increased urbanization in flood-hazard areas...

Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: July 9, 2018
Status: Active

International Water Resources Activities

Water projects of international interest.

Contacts: Verne Schneider
Date published: June 26, 2018
Status: Active

FIM Toolbox: Prepare Your FIM Science

The FIM Toolbox contains comprehensive information on the Flood Inundation Mapping program, including how to develop a flood inundation map library. This section of the FIM Toolbox provides information on how to prepare your FIM science. The Toolbox is updated as new resources become available.

Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 15, 2018
Status: Completed

Hurricane Sandy: Tracking Water Levels

During and after Hurricane Sandy, the USGS monitored water levels, storm tide, wave height, and high-water marks at over 224 locations. This information helps the USGS and its partners track the storm and respond to the most-impacted areas.

Date published: June 14, 2018
Status: Completed

Hurricane Matthew: Flood Resources and Tools

During and after Hurricane Matthew, the USGS made flood-flow measurements, maintained streamgages, deployed over 390 instruments, and developed geospatial products to measure and communicate the extent of coastal and inland flooding.

Date published: June 8, 2018
Status: Completed

Facts About Water

Yes, of course the most obvious fact about water is that it is wet, at least in the liquid state. But, there are many more facts about water that make it a most fascinating substance, one that all life on and in the Earth depends on.

Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 7, 2018
Status: Completed

Aquaculture Water Use

As the label in the grocery store says, "Farm Raised Tilapia Fillets" are for sale! Yes, aquaculture and fish farming are big businesses nowadays, and with the rising population of the world, more and more seafood will be grown in the future in aquatic farms.

Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 7, 2018
Status: Completed

Irrigation Water Use

Throughout the world, irrigation (water for agriculture, or growing crops) is probably the most important use of water (except for drinking and washing a smelly dog, perhaps). Irrigation water is essential for keeping fruits, vegetables, and grains growing to feed the world's population, and this has been a constant for thousands of years.

Attribution: Water Resources