Water Resources

Filter Total Items: 435
Date published: June 7, 2018
Status: Completed

Industrial Water Use

The industries that produce metals, wood and paper products, chemicals, gasoline and oils, and those invaluable grabber utensils you use to get your ring (which also needed water to manufacture) out of the garbage disposal are major users of water.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

The Little Cloud That Could... But Why?

As a child, you heard about "The little engine that could", but what about "The little cloud that could"? You can see in this picture a small, solitary little cloud in an otherwise totally clear sky. What is it about that tiny spot in the sky that allows that cloud to form?

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Mining Water Use

Like all other industries, mining corporations need water to make bare rock give up its valuable minerals.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Temperature and Water

Water temperature plays an important role in almost all USGS water science. Water temperature exerts a major influence on biological activity and growth, has an effect on water chemistry, can influence water quantity measurements, and governs the kinds of organisms that live in water bodies.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Vapor Pressure and Water

The vapor pressure of a liquid is the point at which equilibrium pressure is reached, in a closed container, between molecules leaving the liquid and going into the gaseous phase and molecules leaving the gaseous phase and entering the liquid phase. To learn more about the details, keep reading!

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Turbidity and Water

Lucky for us all, our drinking water is almost always clear (very low turbidity). Other water, such as the creek behind your house after a rainstorm, is likely to be highly turbid—brown with floating sediment. Turbidity is the clarity of water and it is an important factor in water quality.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Rivers Contain Groundwater

Naturally, the water running in rivers comes from precipitation that runs off the landscape into the river. But since precipitation also seeps into (and moves) into the ground, you don't often consider that a significant amount of the water flowing in rivers comes from water in the ground seeping back "up" into the river from below. 

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Raindrops are Different Sizes

You've seen a light mist hanging in the air before. And you've had "full sized" water drops splash you in the face, too. So, raindrops are different sizes, but why? Find out below.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Are Raindrops Shaped Like Teardrops?

We all know that raindrops are shaped like teardrops, right? Actually, that is not true. Read on to find out the facts.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Water Color

Is pure water really clear? Not really—even pure water is not colorless, but has a slight blue tint to it. In the natural world you often see water that is definitely not clear. Sediment and organics color natural water shades of brown or green. And if too much iron in present, even your drinking water can have a brown hue. Read on to investigate water color in the environment.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Crest Gage: A Quick Way to Measure River Stage

The maximum height rivers reach during storms and floods is an important "data point" to document. In places where there are not dedicated monitoring equipment, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) often uses "crest stage gages" to record a one-time measurement of the flood peak.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Water Compressibility

Water is essentially incompressible, especially under normal conditions. Yet, in industrial applications water can be tremendously compressed and used to do things like cut through metal.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources