Water Resources

Filter Total Items: 435
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Groundwater Wells

Wells are extremely important to all societies. In many places wells provide a reliable and ample supply of water for home uses, irrigation, and industries. Where surface water is scarce, such as in deserts, people couldn't survive and thrive without groundwater, and people use wells to get at underground water.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Artesian Water and Artesian Wells

Artesian water is really not different from other groundwater, except for the fact that it flows to the land surface because pressure in the rocks underground force it to the surface. But, having water flow to the surface naturally is a handy way to tap groundwater resources.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Pharmaceuticals in Water

There is a growing concern about the occurance of pharmaceuticals in water bodies and in drinking water. Pharmaceuticals get into the water supply via human excretion and by drugs being flushed down the toilet. You might think wastewater treatment plants would take care of the situation, but pharmaceuticals pass through water treatment.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

The Story of Water in Dryville

Read on about our fictional tale of how YOU establish a new town in the desert and the role water plays in all aspects of the process.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Drought and Groundwater Levels

Groundwater decline is a real and serious problem in many places of the Nation and the world. When rainfall is less than normal for several weeks, months, or years, the flow of streams and rivers declines, water levels in lakes and reservoirs fall, and the depth to water in wells increases.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Water Dowsing

"Water dowsing" refers in general to the practice of using a forked stick, rod, pendulum, or similar device to locate underground water, minerals, or other hidden or lost substances, and has been a subject of discussion and controversy for hundreds, if not thousands, of years.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

High-Water Marks and Flooding

At places where the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) does not have real-time monitoring equipment, we use high-water marks to measure the maximum height (stream stage) of a flood or high-water event.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Specific Heat Capacity and Water

Water has a high specific heat capacity—it absorbs a lot of heat before it begins to get hot. You may not know how that affects you, but the specific heat of water has a huge role to play in the Earth's climate and helps determine the habitability of many places around the globe.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Hydroelectric Power: How it Works

So just how do we get electricity from water? Actually, hydroelectric and coal-fired power plants produce electricity in a similar way. In both cases a power source is used to turn a propeller-like piece called a turbine.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Three Gorges Dam: The World's Largest Hydroelectric Plant

The Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River in China is the world's biggest hydroelectric facility. 

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 6, 2018
Status: Completed

Hydroelectric Power: Advantages of Production and Usage

Nothing is perfect on Earth, and that includes the production of electricity using flowing water. Hydroelectric-production facilities are indeed not perfect (a dam costs a lot to build and also can have negative effects on the environment and local ecology), but there are a number of advantages of hydroelectric-power production as opposed to fossil-fuel power production.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: June 5, 2018
Status: Completed

Water Density

In practical terms, density is the weight of a substance for a specific volume. The density of water is roughly 1 gram per milliliter but, this changes with temperature or if there are substances dissolved in it. Ice is less dense than liquid water which is why your ice cubes float in your glass. As you might expect, water density is an important water measurement.

Contacts: Ask USGS
Attribution: Water Resources