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Ecosystems Mission Area

The USGS Ecosystems Mission Area provides science to help America achieve sustainable management and conservation of biological resources in wild and urban spaces, and places in between.

News

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FORT Updates: From Plains to Peaks - Vol. 2 | Issue 2

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Scientists bite back at invasive mosquitoes, work for Hawaiian Honeycreeper conservation

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Friday's Findings - March 8, 2024

Publications

PNAMP February 2024 newsletter

No abstract available.
Authors
Samuel A. Cimino

Geese migrating over the Pacific Ocean select altitudes coinciding with offshore wind turbine blades

Renewable energy facilities are a key part of mitigating climate change, but can pose threats to wild birds and bats, most often through collisions with infrastructure. Understanding collision risk and the factors affecting it can help minimize impacts on wild populations. For wind turbines, flight altitude is a major factor influencing collision risk, and altitude-selection analyses can evaluate
Authors
Emily L. Weiser, Cory T. Overton, David C. Douglas, Michael L. Casazza, Paul L. Flint

Invasive species research—Science for prevention, detection, containment, and control

IntroductionInvasive species research within the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Ecosystems Mission Area focuses on invasive plants, animals, and pathogens throughout the United States. USGS scientists provide science support to help solve the problems posed by these nonnative species while working with partners in the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), other Federal, State, and Territorial ag
Authors
Paul J. Heimowitz, Patrick M. Kocovsky, James J. English

Science

Organic Geochemistry Research Core Technology Team

About the Research The Organic Geochemistry Research Laboratory Core Technology Team (CTT) as part of the Environmental Health Program works to develop targeted and non-targeted analytical methods for the identification and quantitation of chemicals that can impact the health of humans and other organisms, and uses bioassays to screen for receptor inhibition.
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Organic Geochemistry Research Core Technology Team

About the Research The Organic Geochemistry Research Laboratory Core Technology Team (CTT) as part of the Environmental Health Program works to develop targeted and non-targeted analytical methods for the identification and quantitation of chemicals that can impact the health of humans and other organisms, and uses bioassays to screen for receptor inhibition.
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Estimating spatial variation in greater sage-grouse lek buffers using seasonal space use models

Greater sage-grouse ( Centrocercus urophasianus ) management relies on the identification and protection of core habitat for the species. Core areas are often centered on leks where the potential impacts of anthropogenic development and other disturbances can be evaluated based on buffer distances around active leks. While buffer distances have been quantified for some regions, sage-grouse space...
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Estimating spatial variation in greater sage-grouse lek buffers using seasonal space use models

Greater sage-grouse ( Centrocercus urophasianus ) management relies on the identification and protection of core habitat for the species. Core areas are often centered on leks where the potential impacts of anthropogenic development and other disturbances can be evaluated based on buffer distances around active leks. While buffer distances have been quantified for some regions, sage-grouse space...
Learn More

A user-friendly decision support tool for monitoring and managing greater sage-grouse populations

Researchers within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Colorado State University (CSU) developed a hierarchical population monitoring framework for managing greater sage-grouse ( Centrocercus urophasianus ) populations and the sagebrush ecosystems that they depend upon for survival and reproduction. This hierarchical population monitoring strategy now serves as a foundation for future...
link

A user-friendly decision support tool for monitoring and managing greater sage-grouse populations

Researchers within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Colorado State University (CSU) developed a hierarchical population monitoring framework for managing greater sage-grouse ( Centrocercus urophasianus ) populations and the sagebrush ecosystems that they depend upon for survival and reproduction. This hierarchical population monitoring strategy now serves as a foundation for future...
Learn More