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Ecosystems Mission Area

The USGS Ecosystems Mission Area provides science to help America achieve sustainable management and conservation of biological resources in wild and urban spaces, and places in between.

News

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Scientists bite back at invasive mosquitos, work for Hawaiian Honeycreeper conservation

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Friday's Findings - March 8, 2024

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In a recently published study, FORT scientists and collaborators synthesize data from 26,729 post-burn vegetation plots to determine the effects of fire and climate on non-native plant invasion

Publications

Invasive species research—Science for prevention, detection, containment, and control

IntroductionInvasive species research within the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Ecosystems Mission Area focuses on invasive plants, animals, and pathogens throughout the United States. USGS scientists provide science support to help solve the problems posed by these nonnative species while working with partners in the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), other Federal, State, and Territorial ag
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Paul J. Heimowitz, Patrick M. Kocovsky, James J. English

Fewer bowl traps and more hand netting can increase effective number of bee species and reduce excessive captures

Reports increasingly point to substantial declines in wild bee abundance and diversity, yet there is uncertainty about how best to measure these attributes in wild bee populations. Two commonly used methods are passive trapping with bee bowls or active netting of bees on flowers, but each of these has drawbacks. Comparing the outcomes of the two methods is complicated by their uncomparable units o
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Diane L. Larson, Nora P. Pennarola, Julia B. Leone, Jennifer L. Larson

Joint spatial modeling bridges the gap between disparate disease surveillance and population monitoring efforts informing conservation of at-risk bat species

White-Nose Syndrome (WNS) is a wildlife disease that has decimated hibernating bats since its introduction in North America in 2006. As the disease spreads westward, assessing the potentially differential impact of the disease on western bat species is an urgent conservation need. The statistical challenge is that the disease surveillance and species response monitoring data are not co-located, av
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Christian Stratton, Kathryn Irvine, Katharine M. Banner, Emily S. Almberg, Daniel Bachen, Kristina Smucker

Science

Functional and Molecular Bioassay Core Technology Team

About the Research The Functional and Molecular Bioassay Core Technology Team (CTT) as part of the Environmental Health Program utilizes reporter assays, quantitative gene expression analyses, and high-throughput sequencing methods to produce functional endpoints across a broad scope of environmental topics and sample matrices.
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Functional and Molecular Bioassay Core Technology Team

About the Research The Functional and Molecular Bioassay Core Technology Team (CTT) as part of the Environmental Health Program utilizes reporter assays, quantitative gene expression analyses, and high-throughput sequencing methods to produce functional endpoints across a broad scope of environmental topics and sample matrices.
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Hydrogeophysics Core Technology Team

About the Research. The Hydrogeophysics Core Technology Team (CTT) as part of the Environmental Health Program specializes in locating and quantifying exchanges of groundwater and surface water, along with characterizing geologic structure and mapping hydrologic connectivity across varied landscapes.
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Hydrogeophysics Core Technology Team

About the Research. The Hydrogeophysics Core Technology Team (CTT) as part of the Environmental Health Program specializes in locating and quantifying exchanges of groundwater and surface water, along with characterizing geologic structure and mapping hydrologic connectivity across varied landscapes.
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Behavioral Toxicology Core Technology Team

About the Research. The Environmental Health Program supports scientists in the Behavioral Toxicology Core Technology Team (CTT) at the Columbia Environmental Research Center. The scientists identify how contaminants alter the behavior of organisms and what implication those changes may have on individuals, populations, and communities.
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Behavioral Toxicology Core Technology Team

About the Research. The Environmental Health Program supports scientists in the Behavioral Toxicology Core Technology Team (CTT) at the Columbia Environmental Research Center. The scientists identify how contaminants alter the behavior of organisms and what implication those changes may have on individuals, populations, and communities.
Learn More