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Environmental Health

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The Toxic Substances Hydrology and Contaminant Biology Programs work collaboratively to assess and differentiate the environmental contaminant and pathogen exposures that cause actual health risks versus those that are only perceived. Specialized teams of hydrologists, geologists, chemists, biologists, and geographers work together in the field and laboratories across the United States.

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Featured Science Activities

Featured Science Activities

Our Science Feature Articles highlight recent USGS environmental health science activities.

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USGS GeoHealth Newsletter

USGS GeoHealth Newsletter

The GeoHealth Newsletter provides information on new USGS science activities related to safeguarding the health of fish, wildlife, domesticated animals, livestock, and people from environmental exposures to contaminants and pathogens.

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Date published: July 27, 2018

Follow National Wildfire Information in the Palm of Your Hand: GeoMAC Goes Mobile

The public can now access information about active wildfires across the country using a smartphone.

Date published: July 13, 2018

Reducing Mercury Loads in The Cosumnes River

The Cosumnes River watershed has seasonal, non-point source hotspots for total mercury and methylmercury production, which discharge to the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta in north-central California. To reduce mercury loads to the Delta, researchers created open-water deep cells at the downstream end of wetlands.

Date published: July 10, 2018

Ospreys Benefit as Contaminants Decrease in Delaware Estuary

Lower levels of environmental contaminants—including pesticides, flame retardants and other pollutants—were recently found in osprey eggs in the Delaware Estuary compared to those tested from the 1970s through the early 2000s. 

USGS specializes in science at the environment-health interface, by characterizing the processes that affect the interaction among the physical environment, the living environment, and people, and the resulting factors that affect ecological and human exposure to disease agents.

Our Science Strategy
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Date published: November 9, 2018
Status: Active

Prevalence of novel, emerging hepatitis viruses in wild white suckers and their association with liver tumors in the Great Lakes region

Prevalence of novel, emerging hepatitis viruses in wild white suckers and their association with liver tumors in the Great Lakes region

Date published: October 23, 2018
Status: Active

Assessment of the immune status of wild and laboratory-maintained smallmouth bass

Deaths of young-of-year smallmouth bass in the Chesapeake Bay drainage has been noted since 2005. Studies of affected fish have found bacterial, viral and parasitic infections. Mixed infections suggest these fish are immunosuppressed. Understanding the role of specific pathogens and environmental factors that contribute to their presence is important but equally important is the understanding...

Date published: September 26, 2018
Status: Active

Is Uranium in Water Resources near the Grand Canyon a Health Hazard?

The public worries that uranium in natural geologic formations, mine tailings, dusts, water, and other geologic materials can pose a health hazard to humans and wildlife.

Our specialized teams of hydrologists, chemists, and geologists working together at a field site in the Grand Canyon region of the United States have shown:

Elevated uranium concentrations (above the drinking...

Date published: September 26, 2018
Status: Active

Can There be Unintended Benefits when Wastewater Treatment Infrastructure is Upgraded?

Science from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and other entities has shown that a mixture of natural and synthetic estrogens and other similar chemicals are discharged from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to streams and rivers.

USGS and University of Colorado hydrologists, chemists, geologists, and biologists studied the chemistry and biology of Boulder Creek downstream of Boulder ...

Date published: September 25, 2018
Status: Active

Are Spills from Swine Lagoons Causing Downstream Health Hazards?

There are no national databases or tracking of the number or frequency of manure spills in the United States. Some past spills have been shown to result from events such as equipment failures, over-application of manure to agricultural fields, runoff from open feedlots, storage overflow, accidents with manure transporting equipment, severe weather events, or possibly deliberate actions....

Date published: September 25, 2018
Status: Active

What Are the Health Hazards from Contaminants Released to the Environment by Natural Disasters?

Our specialized teams of hydrologists, chemists, and geologists working together at field sites in Northeastern US after Hurricane Sandy have shown:

  • Metal contaminants were released to the environment after Hurricane Sandy due to some dune restoration activities.
  • In other locations the storm actually decreased contaminant exposures to bottom dwelling aquatic biota.
  • ...
Date published: September 24, 2018
Status: Active

Are Naturally Occurring Microbiological Toxins in Water Resources a Health Hazard?

A growing number of human gastrointestinal, respiratory, dermatologic, and neurologic effects, as well as dog and livestock illnesses and deaths, in the United States have been linked to exposures to algal blooms in recreational lakes and stock ponds.

Some of the blooms contain cyanobacteria, which have the potential to produce cyanotoxins in freshwater systems. However, the connection...

Date published: September 24, 2018
Status: Active

What is the Chemical and Microbial Content of Our Tap Waters?

Safe Drinking Water Act compliance addresses the safety of public-supply water systems. The composition of public-supply drinking water is generally only tested at the treatment plant, and not at the tap after traveling through the water distribution system. Only lead and copper are tested at a subset of residential and other taps. Testing of water in private wells is rare unless local health...

Date published: September 24, 2018
Status: Active

Are Tumors in Wild Fish Harvested in the Great Lakes Region Related to Contaminants in Water Resources?

Our specialized teams of scientists are working in our laboratories and at field sites around the Great Lakes in collaboration with other federal and state resource agencies to document the prevalence of skin and liver tumors. Tumor prevalence in white suckers (Catostomus commersonii), a fish harvested as a food source by local communities, is related to the degree of urbanization in watershed...

Date published: September 24, 2018
Status: Active

Are Spills Associated with Deep Well Injection of Wastewater from Oil and Gas Operations a Health Hazard?

We have specialized teams of hydrologists, chemists, biologists, and geologists working together in the New River Gorge National River watershed to answer this question.

 Wastewater generated in association with oil and gas operations at this site is managed by injection in deep wells designed to safely dispose and contain contaminants in deep geologic formations.

Contaminants...

Date published: September 11, 2018
Status: Active

Food Resources Science Team

Access to an adequate, safe, and sustainable food supply is one of the highest priorities for our society. Agricultural crop and livestock production often occur within the same landscapes. Their yields as well as pests, diseases, and other threats are effectively managed by using a variety of tools such as synthetic nutrients, pesticides, and veterinary pharmaceuticals. Best management...

Contacts: Dana W Kolpin
Date published: September 11, 2018
Status: Active

Land Stewardship Science Team

Managers of federal lands (national parks and monuments, refuges, wildlands, etc.) need to use chemicals to deal with difficult issues such as stopping wildfires, controlling wildlife disease, and removing non-native plants and animals. Sometimes, using chemicals to deal with these issues has the potential to cause unintended consequences and unforeseen health impacts to both humans and other...

The Environmental Health Mission Area develops methods and tools to measure and assess the environmental health of watersheds and the organisms living in them. Our investigations generate and interpret environmental contaminant, biological activity, and effects data. All of which is provided to the public in our publications.

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Date published: February 12, 2018

Shoreline change rates in salt marsh units in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey

This dataset displays shoreline change rates at the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (EBFNWR), which spans over Great Bay, Little Egg Harbor, and Barnegat Bay in New Jersey, USA

Date published: October 19, 2017

Pharmaceuticals in water, fish, and ospreys nesting in Delaware River and Bay

Exposure of wildlife to Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs) is likely to occur but evidence of hazard and risk is limited. One exposure pathway that has received attention is trophic transfer of APIs in a water-fish-osprey food chain. 

Date published: October 19, 2017

Toxicity Assessment of Sediments Collected Upstream and Downstream of the White Dam in Clarke County, Georgia

A breach in the White Dam has been proposed to facilitate fish passage. As a Technical Assistance project, the U.S. Geological Survey provided toxicity assessments of sediment samples collected by USEPA personnel. 

Date published: October 19, 2017

Exposure of Peromyscus leucopus to lead and cadmium in the Southeast Missouri Lead Mining District

The exposure of white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) to lead and cadmium and the potential associated toxic effects were examined at three sites contaminated with lead in the Southeast Missouri Lead Mining District and at a reference site. 

Date published: October 19, 2017

Nutrient levels in surface waters of the Conasauga River and other tributaries within the Coosa River Watershed

Data Release for Report describes surface-water nutrient concentrations from multiple sites on the Conasauga River in northern Georgia in comparison with rivers in adjacent watersheds

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Date published: September 20, 2016

The Eastern Region Initiative on the Clinch (ERIC)

The Clinch-Powell River Basins Spanning Virginia and Tennessee

Date published: March 15, 2016

SCoRR Mapping Web Application

The Sediment-bound Contaminant Resiliency and Response (SCoRR) Mapping Application was developed to allow users to visualize and view information generated during this study. Additional datasets including Census data, the National Land Cover Database, and National Hydrography data are also provided for users to generate custom maps.

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Year Published: 2018

Examination of contaminant exposure and reproduction of ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) nesting in Delaware Bay and River in 2015

A study of ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) nesting in the coastal Inland Bays of Delaware, and the Delaware Bay and Delaware River in 2015 examined spatial and temporal trends in contaminant exposure, food web transfer and reproduction. Concentrations of organochlorine pesticides and metabolites, polychlorinated biphenyls...

Rattner, Barnett A.; Lazarus, Rebecca S.; Bean, Thomas G.; McGowan, Peter C.; Callahan, Carl R.; Erickson, Richard A.; Hale, Robert
Rattner, B. A., Lazarus, R. S., Bean, T. G., McGowan, P. C., Callahan, C. R., Erickson, R. A., and Hale, R. C., 2018, Examination of contaminant exposure and reproduction of ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) nesting in Delaware Bay and River in 2015: Science of the Total Environment, v. 639, p. 596-607. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.05.068

Year Published: 2018

Female hatchling American kestrels have a larger hippocampus than males: A link with sexual size dimorphism?

The brain and underlying cognition may vary adaptively according to an organism’s ecology. As with all raptor species, adult American kestrels (Falco sparverius) are sexually dimorphic with females being larger than males. Related to this sexual dimorphism, kestrels display sex differences in hunting and migration, with females ranging more widely...

Guigueno, Melanie F.; Karouna-Renier, Natalie K.; Henry, Paula F. P.; Head, Jessica A.; Peters, Lisa E.; Palace, Vince P.; Letcher, Robert J.; Fernie, Kimberly J.
Guigueno, M. F., Karouna-Renier, N. K., Henry, P. F. P., Head, J. A., Peters, L. E., Palace, V. P., Letcher, R. J., and Fernie, K. J., 2018, Female hatchling American kestrels have a larger hippocampus than males: A link with sexual size dimorphism?: Behavioral Brain Research, v. 349, p. 98-101. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2018.04.037

Year Published: 2018

Toxicity assessment of sediments collected upstream and downstream from the White Dam in Clarke County, Georgia

The White Dam in Clarke County, Georgia, has been proposed for breaching. Efforts to determine potential risks to downstream biota included assessments of sediment collected in the vicinity of the dam. Sediments collected from sites upstream and downstream from the dam were evaluated for toxicity in 42-day exposures using the freshwater amphipod...

Lasier, Peter J.
Lasier, P.J., 2018, Toxicity assessment of sediments collected upstream and downstream from the White Dam in Clarke County, Georgia: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2018–1036, 6 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20181036.

Year Published: 2018

Information to prevent human exposure to disease agents associated with wildlife—U.S. Geological Survey circulars on zoonotic disease

The U.S. Geological Survey in collaboration with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and others have published reports with information about geographic distribution, specific pathogens, disease ecology, and strategies to avoid exposure and infection for a selection of zoonotic diseases. Zoonotic diseases are diseases that can be passed from...

Meteyer, Carol U.; Moede Rogall, Gail
Meteyer, C.U., and Rogall, G.M., 2018, Information to prevent human exposure to disease agents associated with wildlife—U.S. Geological Survey circulars on zoonotic disease: U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet 2017–3077, 4 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/fs20173077.

Year Published: 2018

Anomalous bioaccumulation of lead in the earthworm Eisenoides lonnbergi (Michaelsen)

Lead concentrations in soil organisms are usually well below those in the associated soil and tend to decrease with each higher trophic level in a food chain. Earthworms of the species Eisenoides lonnbergi provide an exception to this observation, accumulating very high concentrations of lead from acidic soils. Earthworms belonging to...

Beyer, W. Nelson; Codling, Eton E.; Rutzke, Michael A.
Beyer, W. N., Codling, E. E., and Rutzke, M. A., 2018, Anomalous bioaccumulation of lead in the earthworm Eisenoides lonnbergi (Michaelsen): Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, v. 37, no. 3, p. 914-919. https://doi.org/10.1002/etc.4031

Year Published: 2018

Environmental contaminants of health-care origin: Exposure and potential effects in wildlife

A diverse range of fauna could be exposed to active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) via diet, dermal absorption or bioconcentration. Low level exposures of free-ranging wildlife to APIs has only been demonstrated for a few pathways (e.g., ingestion of fish in estuaries by piscivorous birds), and many remain hypothetical (e.g., ingestion of...

Bean, Thomas; Rattner, Barnett A.
Bean, T.G. and Rattner, B.A., 2018, Environmental Contaminants of Health-Care Origin: Exposure and Potential Effects in Wildlife, in Boxall, A.B.A. and Kookana, R.S., editors, Health Care and Environmental Contamination, Elsevier, Environmental Contamination 11, p. 87-122.

Year Published: 2018

Biomarker responses of Peromyscus leucopus exposed to lead and cadmium in the Southeast Missouri Lead Mining District

Biomarker responses and histopathological lesions have been documented in laboratory mammals exposed to elevated concentrations of lead and cadmium. The exposure of white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) to these metals and the potential associated toxic effects were examined at three contaminated sites in the Southeast Missouri Lead Mining...

Beyer, W. Nelson; Casteel, Stan W.; Friedrichs, Kristen R.; Gramlich, Eric; Houseright, Ruth A.; Nichols, John W.; Karouna-Renier, Natalie K.; Kim, Dae Young; Rangen, Kathleen; Rattner, Barnett A.; Schultz, Sandra
Beyer, W. N., Casteekm , S.W., Friedrichs, K. R., Gramlich, E., Houseright, R. A., Nichols, J. R., Karouna-Renier, N. K., Kim, D. Y., Rangen, K. L., Rattner, B. A., and Schultz, S. L., 2018, Biomarker responses of Peromyscus leucopus exposed to lead and cadmium in the Southeast Missouri Lead Mining District: Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, v. 190, Article104, 16p. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10661-017-6442-0

Year Published: 2018

Anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity to non-target wildlife under controlled exposure conditions

Much of our understanding of anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity to non-target wildlife has been derived from molecular through whole animal research and registration studies in domesticated birds and mammals, and to a lesser degree from trials with captive wildlife. Using these data, an adverse outcome pathway identifying molecular initiating and...

van den Brink, Nico; Elliott, J.; Shore, R.; Rattner, B.; Rattner, Barnett A.; Mastrota, F. Nicholas
Rattner, B.A. and Mastrota, F.N., 2017, Anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity to non-target wildlife under controlled exposure conditions, in van den Brink, N.W., Elliott, J.E., Shore, R.F., and Rattner, B.A., editors, Anticoagulant Rodenticides and Wildlife: Springer, Cham, Emerging Topics in Ecotoxicology (Principles, Approaches and Perspectives) 5, p. 45-86.

Year Published: 2018

Anticoagulant rodenticides and wildlife: Concluding remarks

Rodents are known to affect human society globally in various adverse ways, resulting in a widespread demand for their continuous control. Anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) have been, and currently remain, the cornerstone of rodent control throughout the world. Although alternative control methods exist, they are generally less effective. ARs work...

van den Brink, Nico W.; Elliott, John E.; Shore, Richard F.; Rattner, Barnett A.
van den Brink, N.W., Elliott, J.E., Shore, R.F., and Rattner, B.A., 2017, Anticoagulant rodenticides and wildlife: Concluding remarks, in van den Brink, N.W., Elliott, J.E., Shore, R.F., and Rattner, B.A., editors, Anticoagulant Rodenticides and Wildlife: Cham, Springer, Emerging Topics in Ecotoxicology (Principles, Approaches and Perspectives) 5, p. 379-386.

Year Published: 2018

Anticoagulant rodenticides and wildlife: Introduction

Rodents have interacted with people since the beginning of systematic food storage by humans in the early Neolithic era. Such interactions have had adverse outcomes such as threats to human health, spoiling and consumption of food sources, damage to human infrastructure and detrimental effects on indigenous island wildlife (through inadvertent...

van den Brink, Nico W.; Elliott, John E.; Shore, Richard F.; Rattner, Barnett A.; van den Brink, Nico W.; Elliott, John E.; Shore, Richard F.; Rattner, Barnett A.
van den Brink, N.W., Elliott, J.E., Shore, R.F., and Rattner, B.A., 2017, Anticoagulant rodenticides and wildlife: Introduction, in van den Brink, N.W., Elliott, J.E., Shore, R.F., and Rattner, B.A., editors, Anticoagulant Rodenticides and Wildlife: Springer, Cham, Emerging Topics in Ecotoxicology (Principles, Approaches and Perspectives) 5, p. 1-9.

Year Published: 2017

Cobalt—Styles of deposits and the search for primary deposits

Cobalt (Co) is a potentially critical mineral. The vast majority of cobalt is a byproduct of copper and (or) nickel production. Cobalt is increasingly used in magnets and rechargeable batteries. More than 50 percent of primary cobalt production is from the Central African Copperbelt. The Central African Copperbelt is the only sedimentary rock-...

Hitzman, Murray W.; Bookstrom, Arthur A.; Slack, John F.; Zientek, Michael L.
Hitzman, M.W., Bookstrom, A.A., Slack, J.F., and Zientek, M.L., 2017, Cobalt—Styles of deposits and the search for primary deposits: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2017–1155, 47 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20171155.

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Diagram showing how wastewater discharging from wastewater treatment plants
December 31, 2018

Diagram showing how wastewater discharging from wastewater treatment p

Diagram showing how wastewater discharging from wastewater treatment plants might flow downstream and end up as part of the source water for drinking-water treatment plants.

Eosin-nigrosin staining of spermatozoa from common carp  testes collected from the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Nevada
September 24, 2018

Eosin-nigrosin staining of spermatozoa from common carp

Eosin-nigrosin staining of spermatozoa from common carp (Cyprinus carpio) testes collected from the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Nevada

Microscopic video imaging for computerized analysis of sperm motility
September 24, 2018

Microscopic video imaging for computerized analysis of sperm motility

Microscopic video imaging is used for computerized analysis of sperm motility parameters

Tablet-enabled field forms have been developed to help coordinate field effortsand collect site information
September 24, 2018

Tablet-enabled field forms have been developed to help field efforts

Tablet-enabled field forms have been developed to help coordinate field efforts, collect site information, GPS coordinates, photos, and control data collection.

A USGS scientist prepares a sample to test the effect of antibiotics on denitrifying bacteria within a glove box
September 24, 2018

A USGS scientist prepares a sample to test the effect of antibiotics

A USGS scientist prepares a sample to test the effect of antibiotics on denitrifying bacteria within a glove box. A glove box allows scientists to work with samples in an anaerobic (no oxygen) atmosphere, the conditions under which denitrification occurs.

Using the 384-well plate format, a single zebrafish embryo is tested in each well
September 24, 2018

Using the 384-well plate format, a single zebrafish embryo is tested

Using the 384-well plate format, a single zebrafish embryo is tested in each well. This is an example of a 72 hour post fertilization fli1:egfp zebrafish (3 millimeters long) imaged under a fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) filter.

Molecular Devices ImageXpress† High-Content Imaging System
September 24, 2018

Molecular Devices ImageXpress† High-Content Imaging System

Molecular Devices ImageXpress High-Content Imaging System

Molecular Devices ImageXpress† High-Content Imaging System
September 24, 2018

Molecular Devices ImageXpress† High-Content Imaging System

Molecular Devices ImageXpress High-Content Imaging System that can generate more than 25,000 images in less than 5 hours of automated image acquisition.

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientist working on data analysis of cyanotoxins in water samples
September 24, 2018

(USGS scientist working on data analysis of cyanotoxins in water

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientist working on data analysis of cyanotoxins in water samples

Keith A. Loftin, USGS, is the lead scientist for algal and cyanobacterial toxins
September 24, 2018

Keith A. Loftin is the lead scientist for algal and cyanobacteria

Keith A. Loftin, USGS, is the lead scientist for algal and cyanobacterial toxins

USGS scientists evaluating the nebulizer assembly in a mixed mode ionization source of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer
September 24, 2018

USGS scientists evaluating the nebulizer assembly

USGS scientists evaluating the nebulizer assembly in a mixed mode ionization source of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer used to measure individual cyanotoxins

Cover of a report features a photo of Yosemite with the sun just behind El Capitan, with text and graphics laid on top.
August 27, 2018

Cover of California's Fourth Climate Change Assessment Report

Cover of the 2018 publication, "California’s Fourth Climate Change Assessment: Statewide Summary Report."

In addition to news releases on our latest papers, we provide Science Feature Articles that highlight results from environmental health science activities across the U.S. Geological Survey.

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Date published: July 27, 2018

Follow National Wildfire Information in the Palm of Your Hand: GeoMAC Goes Mobile

The public can now access information about active wildfires across the country using a smartphone.

Date published: July 13, 2018

Reducing Mercury Loads in The Cosumnes River

The Cosumnes River watershed has seasonal, non-point source hotspots for total mercury and methylmercury production, which discharge to the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta in north-central California. To reduce mercury loads to the Delta, researchers created open-water deep cells at the downstream end of wetlands.

Date published: July 10, 2018

Ospreys Benefit as Contaminants Decrease in Delaware Estuary

Lower levels of environmental contaminants—including pesticides, flame retardants and other pollutants—were recently found in osprey eggs in the Delaware Estuary compared to those tested from the 1970s through the early 2000s. 

Date published: June 29, 2018

Assessing Portable Lead Analyzers for Wildlife Conservation

Lead exposure in wildlife is a widespread management and conservation concern. Low-cost, portable lead analyzers have improved access and cost-effectiveness of determining lead concentrations in animal blood samples, yet analytical bias and lack of quality-assurance–quality-control measures can confound results.

Date published: June 28, 2018

What’s New in Fiscal Year 2019

Information on funding for Environmental Health Mission Area programs for fiscal year 2019.

Date published: April 5, 2018

USGS Scientists Develop New Tool to Determine if Vermiculite Insulation Contains Asbestos

U.S. Geological Survey scientists and partners have created an onsite, time-saving technique for building inspectors to ascertain whether vermiculite insulation contains amphibole asbestos. The findings are featured in the April 2 edition of American Mineralogist.

Date published: November 10, 2017

Investigating Lung Disease in Military Veterans

Six years ago, veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan had trouble breathing normally. The list of potential causes that soldiers were exposed to seemed endless: smoke from burn pits used for trash disposal, desert dust, diesel generator exhaust, humidity and temperature extremes, explosives, and city trash and sewage.

Date published: September 18, 2017

Tracking the Bad Guys: Toxic Algal Blooms

Every few days, a fleet of satellites orbiting 700 kilometers above the Earth scans the continental United States to help keep Americans safe. But these eyes in the sky aren’t seeking terrorists or enemy combatants: they scrutinize lakes to locate problems of the microbial variety, namely cyanobacteria.

Date published: June 19, 2017

Satellite Imagery Can Track Harmful Algal Blooms

A joint collaboration between EPA, NOAA, NASA, and USGS scientists has demonstrated that satellite imagery can be used to track the frequency of harmful algal blooms.  The satellites can accomplish this by measuring certain algal pigments in the water.

Date published: June 5, 2017

New USGS Science Plan Designed to Help Plan for Drought Effects on People, Communities, and Ecosystems

The U. S. Geological Survey is poised to bring a dynamic array of science and tools to help decision-makers manage and offset effects of increased drought across the United States, according to a drought plan report released today.

Date published: May 24, 2017

Igniting a New Trend in Public Safety

U.S. Geological Survey scientists and partners are taking technology to the next level, using unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), commonly called drones, to acquire both fire intensity and emissions data during prescribed burns.

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