Global Seismographic Network

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The Global Seismographic Network (GSN) is a permanent digital network of state-of-the-art seismological and geophysical sensors connected by a telecommunications network. The GSN provides, worldwide monitoring of the Earth, with over 150 modern seismic stations distributed globally.

Station Information and Operations

Station Information and Operations

Real-time information about the status of the GSN stations, real-time recordings.

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Seismic Waveforms - IRIS Data Management Center

Seismic Waveforms - IRIS Data Management Center

Access to seismic waveform data and tools for analysis.

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News

Date published: April 6, 2017

Earthquake Early Warning: Vital for City Transit

Although no one can reliably predict earthquakes, today’s technology is advanced enough to rapidly detect seismic waves as an earthquake begins, calculate the maximum expected shaking, and send alerts to surrounding areas before damage can occur. This technology is known as “earthquake early warning” (EEW).

Date published: January 7, 2015

Fewer Large Earthquakes in 2014

While the number of large earthquakes fell to 12 in 2014, from 19 in 2013, several moderate temblors hit areas relatively new to seismicity, including Oklahoma and Kansas, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Worldwide, 11 earthquakes reached magnitude 7.0-7.9 and one registered magnitude 8.2, in Iquique, Chile, on April 1.

Date published: January 8, 2014

New Sensor Network to Detail Virginia Earthquakes

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey and Virginia Tech will install a 20-station seismic network in the central Virginia area beginning Jan. 8. The new sensors – each about the size of a soda can – will provide information to help the researchers study the background seismicity in the area and any continuing aftershocks of the Aug. 23, 2011 earthquake near Louisa and Mineral, Va.

Filter Total Items: 3
Date published: March 4, 2016

Station Information and Operations

Zoom in on an area to view all seismic network operation stations on the interactive map.

Date published: March 4, 2016

Seismogram Displays

This interactive map displays seismographic activity. Click on a red seismogram icon or select a region from list list.

Date published: March 4, 2016

IRIS Data Management Center

Contains archived data from the Global Seismic Network.

Filter Total Items: 46
Year Published: 2018

Laboratory tests of three Z‐Land Fairfield Nodal 5‐Hz, three‐component sensors

We conduct a number of laboratory tests at the Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory to verify the self‐noise and fidelity in which 3 three‐component Fairfield Nodal Z‐Land, Generation 2, 5‐Hz sensors are able to record seismic signals. In addition to the incoherent self‐noise of the sensors, we estimate the sensitivity of the units in digital...

Ringler, Adam; Anthony, Robert E.; Karplus, M.S; Holland, Austin; Wilson, David
Ringler, A. T., R. E. Anthony, M. S. Karplus, A. A. Holland, and D. C. Wilson (2018). Laboratory Tests of Three Z-Land Fairfield Nodal 5-Hz, Three-Component Sensors, Seismological Research Letters,

Year Published: 2018

The widespread influence of Great Lakes microseisms across the United States revealed by the 2014 polar vortex

During the winter of 2014, a weak polar vortex brought record cold temperatures to the north‐central (“Midwest”) United States, and the Great Lakes reached the highest extent of ice coverage (92.5%) since 1979. This event shut down the generation of seismic signals caused by wind‐driven wave action within the lakes (termed “lake microseisms”),...

Anthony, Robert E.; Ringler, Adam; Wilson, David
Anthony, R.E., A.T. Ringler, D.C. Wilson (2018), The Widespread Influence of Great Lakes Microseisms Across the United States Revealed by the 2014 Polar Vortex, Geophysical Research Letters, 45, 3436-3444. doi:10.1002/2017GL076690

Year Published: 2018

Spatial and spectral interpolation of ground-motion intensity measure observations

Following a significant earthquake, ground‐motion observations are available for a limited set of locations and intensity measures (IMs). Typically, however, it is desirable to know the ground motions for additional IMs and at locations where observations are unavailable. Various interpolation methods are available, but because IMs or their...

Worden, Charles; Thompson, Eric M.; Baker, Jack W.; Bradley, Brendon A.; Luco, Nicolas; Wald, David J.
C. Bruce Worden, Eric M. Thompson, Jack W. Baker, Brendon A. Bradley, Nicolas Luco, David J. Wald; Spatial and Spectral Interpolation of Ground‐Motion Intensity Measure Observations. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America doi: https://doi.org/10.1785/0120170201

Year Published: 2017

Improvements in absolute seismometer sensitivity calibration using local earth gravity measurements

The ability to determine both absolute and relative seismic amplitudes is fundamentally limited by the accuracy and precision with which scientists are able to calibrate seismometer sensitivities and characterize their response. Currently, across the Global Seismic Network (GSN), errors in midband sensitivity exceed 3% at the 95% confidence...

Anthony, Robert E.; Ringler, Adam; Wilson, David
Anthony, R.E., A.T. Ringler, D.C. Wilson (2017), Improvements in Absolute Seismometer Sensitivity Calibration using Local Earth Gravity Measurements, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 108, 503-510. doi:10.1785/0120170218

Year Published: 2017

Effects of thermal variability on broadband seismometers: Controlled experiments, observations, and implications

Isolating seismic instruments from temperature fluctuations is routine practice within the seismological community. However, the necessary degree of thermal stability required in broadband installations to avoid generating noise or compromising the fidelity in the seismic records is largely unknown and likely application dependent. To quantify the...

Doody, Claire; Ringler, Adam; Anthony, Robert E.; Wilson, David; Holland, Austin; Hutt, Charles R.; Sandoval, Leo
Doody, C. D., A. T. Ringler, R. E. Anthony, D. C. Wilson, A. A. Holland, C. R. Hutt, and L. D. Sandoval (2017). Effects of thermal variability on broadband seismometers: Controlled experiments, observations, and implications, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 108 (1), 493-502.

Year Published: 2017

Detection and characterization of pulses in broadband seismometers

Pulsing - caused either by mechanical or electrical glitches, or by microtilt local to a seismometer - can significantly compromise the long‐period noise performance of broadband seismometers. High‐fidelity long‐period recordings are needed for accurate calculation of quantities such as moment tensors, fault‐slip models, and normal‐mode...

Wilson, David; Ringler, Adam; Hutt, Charles R.
Wilson, D. C., A. T. Ringler, C. R. Hutt (2017). Detection and characterization of pulses in broadband seismometers, Bull. Seis. Soc. Amer., 107, 4, doi:10.1785/0120170089.

Year Published: 2017

Repeatability of testing a small broadband sensor in the Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory Underground Vault

Variability in seismic instrumentation performance plays a fundamental role in our ability to carry out experiments in observational seismology. Many such experiments rely on the assumed performance of various seismic sensors as well as on methods to isolate the sensors from nonseismic noise sources. We look at the repeatability of estimating the...

Ringler, Adam; Holland, Austin; Wilson, David
Ringler, A. T., A. A. Holland, And D. C. Wilson (2017). Repeatability of testing a small broadband sensor in the Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory Underground Vault, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 107, 3, doi: 10.1785/0120170006

Year Published: 2017

Characterizing local variability in long‐period horizontal tilt noise

Horizontal seismic data are dominated by atmospherically induced tilt noise at long periods (i.e., 30 s and greater). Tilt noise limits our ability to use horizontal data for sensitive seismological studies such as observing free earth modes. To better understand the local spatial variability of long‐period horizontal noise, we observe horizontal...

Rohde, M.D.; Ringler, Adam; Hutt, Charles R.; Wilson, David; Holland, Austin; Sandoval, L.D; Storm, Tyler
Rohde, M. D., A. T. Ringler, C. R. Hutt, D. C. Wilson, A. A. Holland, L. D. Sandoval, and T. Storm (2017). Characterizing local variability in long-period horizontal tilt noise, Seismological Research Letters, 88, doi: 10.1785/0220160193

Year Published: 2017

Broadband seismic noise attenuation versus depth at the Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory

Seismic noise induced by atmospheric processes such as wind and pressure changes can be a major contributor to the background noise observed in many seismograph stations, especially those installed at or near the surface. Cultural noise such as vehicle traffic or nearby buildings with air handling equipment also contributes to seismic background...

Hutt, Charles R.; Ringler, Adam; Gee, Lind
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Vol. 107, No. 3, pp. 1402–1412, June 2017, doi: 10.1785/0120160187

Year Published: 2016

PhasePApy: A robust pure Python package for automatic identification of seismic phases

We developed a Python phase identification package: the PhasePApy for earthquake data processing and near‐real‐time monitoring. The package takes advantage of the growing number of Python libraries including Obspy. All the data formats supported by Obspy can be supported within the PhasePApy. The PhasePApy has two subpackages: the PhasePicker and...

Chen, Chen; Holland, Austin

Year Published: 2016

Potential improvements in horizontal very broadband seismic data in the IRIS/USGS component of the Global Seismic Network

The Streckeisen STS‐1 has been the primary vault‐type seismometer used in the over‐150‐station Global Seismographic Network (GSN). This sensor has long been known for its outstanding vertical, very long‐period (e.g., >100  s period), and low‐noise performance, although the horizontal long‐period noise performance is less well...

Ringler, Adam; Steim, J.M.; Zandt, T; Hutt, Charles R.; Wilson, David; Storm, Tyler

Year Published: 2015

A quick SEED tutorial

Introduction A number of different government-funded seismic data centers offer free open-access data (e.g., U.S. Geological Survey, National Earthquake Information Center, the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS), and Data Management System), which can be freely downloaded and shared among different members of the community (...

Ringler, Adam; Evans, John R.
A. T. Ringler and J. R. Evans (2015). A quick SEED tutorial, Seismological Research Letters, 86(6), 1717-1725.

Filter Total Items: 3
Date published: April 6, 2017

Earthquake Early Warning: Vital for City Transit

Although no one can reliably predict earthquakes, today’s technology is advanced enough to rapidly detect seismic waves as an earthquake begins, calculate the maximum expected shaking, and send alerts to surrounding areas before damage can occur. This technology is known as “earthquake early warning” (EEW).

Date published: January 7, 2015

Fewer Large Earthquakes in 2014

While the number of large earthquakes fell to 12 in 2014, from 19 in 2013, several moderate temblors hit areas relatively new to seismicity, including Oklahoma and Kansas, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Worldwide, 11 earthquakes reached magnitude 7.0-7.9 and one registered magnitude 8.2, in Iquique, Chile, on April 1.

Date published: January 8, 2014

New Sensor Network to Detail Virginia Earthquakes

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey and Virginia Tech will install a 20-station seismic network in the central Virginia area beginning Jan. 8. The new sensors – each about the size of a soda can – will provide information to help the researchers study the background seismicity in the area and any continuing aftershocks of the Aug. 23, 2011 earthquake near Louisa and Mineral, Va.