Volcano Hazards Program Office

Data and Tools

Filter Total Items: 57
Date published: January 1, 2017

High-resolution digital elevation dataset for Glacier Peak and vicinity, Washington, based on lidar surveys of August-November, 2014 and June, 2015

Glacier Peak is a 3,214 m (10,544 ft.) stratovolcano composed mainly of dacite. The volcano is located in the Glacier Peak Wilderness Area, in the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, about 100 km (65 mi) northeast of Seattle and 110 km (70 mi) south of the International Boundary with Canada. Since the continental ice sheets receded from the region approximately 15,000 year

Date published: January 1, 2017

Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy data acquired at Sabancaya Volcano (Peru) on 21 May 2016

On 21 May 2016, two Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) instruments were used to measure the radiance of scattered solar radiation passing through the plume emitted from Sabancaya Volcano, Peru. Spectra were recorded in the ultraviolet (UV: 280 – 425 nm) and visible (Vis: 450 – 780 nm) wavelength ranges at 0.6 and 1.2 nm resolution, respective

Date published: January 1, 2017

Terrain model for Icy Bay, Alaska

This digital terrain model of the Icy Bay, Alaska region consists of elevations acquired using airborne Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) merged with bathymetry interpolated from various hydrographic surveys. Hydrographic information for Icy Bay and the lower 9 km of Taan Fiord was primarily from hydrographic surveys and a nautical chart published by the U.S. National Oceanic...

Date published: December 31, 2016

Steepest-Descent Lines for Kīlauea, Mauna Loa, Hualālai, and Mauna Kea Volcanoes, Hawaiʻi

This USGS data release includes two ESRI polyline shapefiles (file_names.shp) describing the describing the steepest-descent lines calculated at two levels of detail (See Process Step for explanation). To increase access to these data, KMZ (Compressed Keyhole Markup Language) versions of the polyline feature layers are included in this release (file_names.kmz). In addition to th

Date published: April 27, 2016

Subscribe to Volcano Notification Services

The Volcano Notification Service (VNS) is a free service that sends you notification emails about volcanic activity happening at U.S. monitored volcanoes. You can customize the VNS to deliver notifications for certain volcanoes or a range of volcanoes, and you can also choose the notification types you want to receive. Notifications are issued by the five U.S. Volcano Observatories.

Date published: March 17, 2016

Volcano Monitoring Data

Many volcanoes in the U.S. are monitored by arrays of several instruments that detect subtle movements within the earth and changes in gas and water chemistry. The Volcano Hazards Program streams this data to its Volcano Observatories and makes it available on volcano-specific websites.

Date published: March 4, 2016

Current Alerts for U.S. Volcanoes

Volcano-alert notifications are produced by Volcano Observatory scientists based on analysis of data from monitoring networks, direct observations, and satellite sensors. They are issued for both increasing and decreasing volcanic activity and include text about the nature of the unrest or eruption and about potential or current hazards and likely outcomes.

Date published: March 4, 2016

Volcano Notification Service (VNS)

The Volcano Notification Service (VNS) is a free service that sends you notification emails about volcanic activity happening at U.S. monitored volcanoes. You can customize the VNS to deliver notifications for certain volcanoes or a range of volcanoes, and you can also choose the notification types you want to receive.

Date published: January 1, 2016

Data from debris-flow run-up experiments conducted in June, 1994, and May, 1997, at the USGS Debris-flow Flume, HJ Andrews Experimental Forest, Blue River, Oregon

The data files consist of four .csv files, with one file for each of four experiment dates (1994_06_21, 1994_06_23, 1997_05_20, and 1997_05_22). Each file contains multiple columns of data, with each column representing either a time measurement or the value of a physical quantity (flow depth, h, flow speed, u, or run-up height, H) measured at that time. Detailed des