Volcano Hazards Program Office

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Shaded relief map showing subtle terraces on the north side of Yellowstone Lake
September 7, 2020

Map showing subtle terraces on the north side of Yellowstone Lake

Shaded relief map based on high-resolution topographic data from lidar and showing subtle terraces on the north side of Yellowstone Lake (a few example terraces are marked by yellow arrows and traced by dashed and dotted white lines). Each terrace represents a high-stand of lake water, which is caused by water backing up into the lake because caldera uplift raised the

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image related to volcanoes. See description
September 3, 2020

Underneath Kīlauea's new landscape, the magma plumbing keeps working

View of the 2018 Kīlauea caldera collapse structures from Kīlauea Overlook within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. USGS photo by K. Mulliken on Sept. 2, 2020.

Color photograph of volcanic fissure
September 3, 2020

fissure 7 of Kīlauea's 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption

On September 3, USGS HVO geologists visited fissure 7 of Kīlauea's 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption. Geologists investigated and documented vent features, and collected samples for ongoing analyses of 2018 eruption dynamics. Fountains from fissure 7 left a hole over the vent area. From this hole, one of several fissure 7 fountains erupted during the 2018 volcanic crisis

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Color photograph of volcanic fissure
September 3, 2020

Kīlauea's 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption fissure 7

Photo of Kīlauea's 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption fissure 7, from Hookupu street and looking west. The rampart is surrounded by fissure 8 lava. This view is of the back side of the rampart; lava fountains erupted on the opposite side of the rampart. 

Color photograph of volcanic fissure
September 3, 2020

fissure 7 rampart, Kīlauea's 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption

View of the front side of fissure 7 rampart, erupted during Kīlauea's 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption. Red oxidation is present in lower layers within the rampart. Golden shelly pāhoehoe from fissure 8 surrounds the rampart. 

Color photograph of volcanic fissure
September 3, 2020

Fissure 21 of Kīlauea's 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption

On September 3, USGS HVO geologists also visited fissure 21 of Kīlauea's 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption. Geologists investigated and documented vent features, and collected samples for ongoing analyses of 2018 eruption dynamics. View of fissure 21 from the northeast. A small hole has formed from collapse of the rampart. Several large collapse blocks and collapse piles

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Color photograph of volcanic fissure
September 3, 2020

Fissure 21, of Kīlauea's 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption

This photo views fissure 21, of Kīlauea's 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption, from the southeast. 

Color photograph of volcanic fissure
September 3, 2020

Fissure 21 of Kīlauea's 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption

Front side of fissure 21 of Kīlauea's 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption. Red oxidation and white mineral precipitates color the front of the rampart. Fountains erupted immediately in front of this feature. 

View of the 2018 Kīlauea caldera collapse structures from Kīlauea Overlook within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. USGS photo by
September 2, 2020

Underneath Kīlauea’s new landscape, the magma plumbing keeps working

View of the 2018 Kīlauea caldera collapse structures from Kīlauea Overlook within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. USGS photo by K. Mulliken on Sept. 2, 2020.

September 1, 2020

Yellowstone Volcano Observatory Monthly Update: September 1, 2020

Mike Poland, Scientist-in-Charge of the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory, gives an overview of activity at Yellowstone during August 2020.
 

Thin section made by slicing a small layer off the surface of a hand sample of Yelowstone lava.
September 1, 2020

Thin section of lava sample from Yellowstone

Thin section made by slicing a small layer off the surface of a hand sample of Yeloowstone lava. Note the marker for scale.

image related to volcanoes. See description
August 27, 2020

Geodesy through time: a history of measuring the shape of Hawaiian volcanoes

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) Global Positioning System (GPS) survey near the coast in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on September 10, 2019 (USGS photo by P. Dotray).