Media Advisory: Cascadia Quake and Orphan Tsunami — Public Lecture

Release Date:

One winter's night in the year 1700, a mysterious tsunami flooded fields and washed away houses in Japan. It arrived without the warning that a nearby earthquake usually provides.

MENLO PARK, Calif. — One winter's night in the year 1700, a mysterious tsunami flooded fields and washed away houses in Japan. It arrived without the warning that a nearby earthquake usually provides. Samurai, merchants and villagers wrote of the event, but nearly three centuries would pass before geological discoveries linked the tsunami to the subduction zone that runs along the Pacific coast of southern British Columbia, Washington, Oregon and northern California. Today, this Trans-Pacific detective story guides preparations for future earthquakes and tsunamis in North America's Cascadia region. 

What:

Illustrated presentation: “The Giant Cascadia Earthquake of January 26, 1700: Detective Stories from North America and Japan
 

Who:

Brian Atwater, USGS geologist
 

When:

Thursday, July 30, 2015

12:00 p.m. — Lecture preview for USGS employees and news media representatives

7:00 p.m.— Public lecture open to all

(Both presentations will be live-streamed online, and archived for later viewing.)
 

Where:

U.S. Geological Survey
Rambo Auditorium, Bldg. 3, 2nd floor
345 Middlefield Road
Menlo Park, Calif.
 

Book:

The Orphan Tsunami of 1700—Japanese Clues to a Parent Earthquake in North America