Media Advisory: Congressman Benishek and Scientists Welcome New Great Lakes “Floating Laboratory”

Release Date:

The U.S. Geological Survey will celebrate the newest addition to its fleet of large research vessels during a traditional ceremony in Cheboygan, Michigan, on Monday. The entire Great Lakes fleet will also be dedicated during the ceremony.

 
 

Reporters: A video series chronicling the construction of the new USGS research vessel Arcticus is available online. 

The U.S. Geological Survey will celebrate the newest addition to its fleet of large research vessels during a traditional ceremony in Cheboygan, Michigan, on Monday. The entire Great Lakes fleet will also be dedicated during the ceremony. 

The new, large research vessel (R/V) Arcticus will enable USGS Great Lakes Science Center scientists to explore fish health and water quality in Lakes Michigan and Huron. This research is used by federal, state and provincial resource managers to protect and restore the lakes’ ecosystems and the $7 billion Great Lakes fishery. 

What: Reporters are invited to the commissioning of the new, state-of-the-art USGS R/V Arcticus. Journalists will have access to highly visual vessel tours and interview opportunities.

Who: U.S. Congressman Dan Benishek
Representatives from the offices of U.S. Senators Gary Peters and Debbie Stabenow
USGS Acting Director Suzette Kimball
Cheboygan Mayor Mark Bronson
Alpena Mayor Matt Waligora

When: Monday, August 31
1 p.m. Commencement
2 p.m. Christening and commissioning ceremony
2:30 p.m. Dedication of the USGS research vessel fleet
Tours of the vessel for attendees and media will follow the dedication

Where: USGS Cheboygan Vessel Base
606 Water Street, Cheboygan (map

The 77 foot R/V Arcticus is replacing the oldest vessel in the USGS fleet, the R/V Grayling, which was one of two USGS research platforms on Lakes Michigan and Huron since 1977. The new R/V Arcticus will offer greater research capabilities, improved health and safety features and lower maintenance costs than its predecessor.  

Vessel construction was funded by the USGS and the Great Lakes Fishery Commission. The boat was designed by JMS Naval Architects of Mystic, Connecticut, and built by the Burger Boat Company of Manitowoc, Wisconsin. 

The entire USGS Great Lakes fleet has been modernized since 1999. The dedication of the fleet ushers in a new era of cutting-edge science for the Great Lakes ecosystem. 

For more information on USGS science in the Great Lakes, please visit the USGS Great Lakes Science Center website.

Image: USGS Research Vessel Arcticus
The new, large research vessel (R/V) Arcticus will enable USGS Great Lakes Science Center scientists to explore fish health and water quality in Lakes Michigan and Huron. This research is used by federal, state and provincial resource managers to protect and restore the lakes’ ecosystems and the $7 billion Great Lakes fishery.The 77 foot R/V Arcticus is replacing the oldest vessel in the USGS fleet, the R/V Grayling, which was the primary USGS research platform on Lakes Michigan and Huron since 1977. The new R/V Arcticus will offer greater research capabilities, increased fuel efficiency, improved health and safety features and lower maintenance costs than its predecessor. Public domain
Image: USGS Research Vessel Arcticus
The new, large research vessel (R/V) Arcticus will enable USGS Great Lakes Science Center scientists to explore fish health and water quality in Lakes Michigan and Huron. This research is used by federal, state and provincial resource managers to protect and restore the lakes’ ecosystems and the $7 billion Great Lakes fishery.The 77 foot R/V Arcticus is replacing the oldest vessel in the USGS fleet, the R/V Grayling, which was the primary USGS research platform on Lakes Michigan and Huron since 1977. The new R/V Arcticus will offer greater research capabilities, increased fuel efficiency, improved health and safety features and lower maintenance costs than its predecessor. Public domain
Image: USGS Research Vessel Arcticus
The new, large research vessel (R/V) Arcticus will enable USGS Great Lakes Science Center scientists to explore fish health and water quality in Lakes Michigan and Huron. This research is used by federal, state and provincial resource managers to protect and restore the lakes’ ecosystems and the $7 billion Great Lakes fishery.The 77 foot R/V Arcticus is replacing the oldest vessel in the USGS fleet, the R/V Grayling, which was the primary USGS research platform on Lakes Michigan and Huron since 1977. The new R/V Arcticus will offer greater research capabilities, increased fuel efficiency, improved health and safety features and lower maintenance costs than its predecessor. Public domain
Image: USGS Research Vessel Arcticus
The new, large research vessel (R/V) Arcticus will enable USGS Great Lakes Science Center scientists to explore fish health and water quality in Lakes Michigan and Huron. This research is used by federal, state and provincial resource managers to protect and restore the lakes’ ecosystems and the $7 billion Great Lakes fishery.The 77 foot R/V Arcticus is replacing the oldest vessel in the USGS fleet, the R/V Grayling, which was the primary USGS research platform on Lakes Michigan and Huron since 1977. The new R/V Arcticus will offer greater research capabilities, increased fuel efficiency, improved health and safety features and lower maintenance costs than its predecessor. Public domain