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Date published: October 8, 2001

USGS Finds West Nile Virus in Missouri, Arkansas

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Madison, Wisc., confirmed today that five dead crows found in the St. Louis, Mo., area tested positive for the West Nile Virus. On Thursday, USGS biologists announced that a dead blue jay, found near El Dorado, Ark., also tested positive for the virus. These most recent cases mark the furthest west the virus has been identified in the U.S.

Date published: October 3, 2001

Weeding Things Out in the Arid Southwest

Saltcedar, an invasive shrub from Eurasia, has the notoriety of siphoning off millions of acre-feet of water from desert aquifers. Its amazing rate of spread, an estimated seven feet per hour, averaged over time, up the Little Colorado River - is difficult to imagine outside of sci-fi flicks.

Date published: October 2, 2001

USGS Hosts 'Show and Tell'

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey’s Earthquake Hazards Team will be on site at an open trench on the Hayward Fault, Tuesday, October 2, to explain to city and county officials and transportation managers, the importance of trenching operations to earthquake research, and the latest results of trenching the Hayward Fault. WHEN: October 2, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Attribution:
Date published: September 25, 2001

Chessie the Manatee on a Comeback Tour After 5-Year Hiatus

By fin and flipper -- this is a manatee that sure knows how to get around! After a five-year disappearance, Chessie, perhaps the most famous and well-traveled manatee along the U.S. Atlantic Coast, has been sighted again in coastal Virginia.

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Date published: September 24, 2001

Strontium Isotope Analyses Reveal the Source of

Geochemical analyses using strontium isotopes show that many of the timbers used to build the prehistoric great houses of Chaco Canyon, N.M., between A.D. 900 and 1150, were hand-carried to the building site from isolated mountaintops 50 to 60 miles away, according to four Arizona scientists.

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Date published: September 20, 2001

USGS Names William Seitz as Deputy Regional Director for Alaska and Director of the Alaska Science Center

Dr.William Seitz has assumed his duties as the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Deputy Regional Director for Alaska and the director of the Alaska Science Center.

Attribution: Region 11: Alaska
Date published: September 20, 2001

Kinsinger Named USGS Regional Biologist

Anne Kinsinger, a biologist and administrator with the U.S. Geological Survey for the past nine years, is now serving as "regional biologist" for that Department of the Interior agency. Her office is located in the USGS Western Region office in the Federal Building at 909 First Avenue, in Seattle.

Date published: September 7, 2001

Scientists Find That Fluid-Like Flow of Rock Occurs Below Faults Following Big Quakes

New technologies in the form of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and the Global Positioning System (GPS) have helped scientists determine that fluid-like flow occurred just below the earth’s crust in the first few months following two recent large California earthquakes.

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Date published: September 5, 2001

USGS Finds West Nile Virus in Chicago-Area Crows

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Madison, Wisc., said today that two dead crows, found in the Chicago area tested positive for the West Nile Virus. Last week, dead crows found near Milwaukee also tested positive for the virus. So far this year, West Nile Virus has been identified in 20 states, the District of Columbia and in southern Ontario.

Date published: August 31, 2001

USGS Finds West Nile Virus in Wisconsin Crows

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Madison, Wisc., said today that two dead crows, found near Milwaukee, are being re-tested for the West Nile Virus. Preliminary tests showed that one of the birds had the virus. Results for the second bird are inconclusive and that bird is being retested. So far this year, West Nile Virus has been identified in 18 states, the District of Columbia

Date published: August 23, 2001

USGS Helps Native American Schools Go Online

Today, August 23, all 185 Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Native American schools are connected to the Internet, marking the completion of the Access Native America (ANA) project. Interior Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs Neal A. McCaleb will today bring the last school online, the Chichiltah/Jones Ranch Community School located on the Navajo reservation in Chichiltah, N.M.

Date published: August 5, 2001

Grassland Birds and Habitat Fragmentation: The Role of Predators

North American grassland areas are increasingly fragmented, which may be having an adverse impact on bird populations, according to biologists at the U.S. Geological Survey.