News

State News Releases

Browse through a comprehensive list of all USGS news items by topic and location.

Subscribe
Filter Total Items: 1,585
USGS science for a changing world logo
June 12, 2001

Last year up; this year down, but the number of sea otters in California remain roughly stable, neither increasing or decreasing rapidly, according to the scientists who study them. Still, a lack of sustained growth worries researchers and sea otter watchers.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 12, 2001

The geology of Colorado National Monument and surrounding areas is presented in a new U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) map that is designed to serve visitors as well as students and the most ardent scientist.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 12, 2001

Radon concentrations in ground water from homeowners’ wells in the Blue Ridge area of the New River watershed, in parts of North Carolina and Virginia, were among the highest measured in the nation in a new report from the U.S. Geological Survey. Radon is a radioactive gas, and radon in air is the second leading cause of lung cancer.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 6, 2001

The third largest spring snowpack in 36 years on Gulkana Glacier won’t necessarily reverse the current slow retreat of the glacier and usher in a new growth cycle, according to U.S. Geological Survey hydrologists who measured the glacier’s snowpack in late April.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 6, 2001

A newly released United States Geological Survey paper indicates that a significant zone of genetic mixing is occurring between northern spotted owls and California spotted owls, particularly in extreme northern California and southern Oregon.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 1, 2001

New Maps/Report by USGS Scientists Show Underwater Features of Crater Lake in Unprecedented Detail Ancient lava flows, volcanic cones and landslides are some of the features below the surface of Crater Lake that are depicted and explained in a report available from the U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 29, 2001

Small Differences in Grain Size Can Have Big Impact on Water Quality: Although the geology and hydrology of an area may appear to be quite similar on a regional scale, differences such as the distribution of fine to coarse sediments in the subsurface can have a significant impact on how chemicals and pesticides move into shallow ground water and surface water. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 25, 2001

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey are drilling a core hole at Kure Beach near the Ft. Fisher Historical Site that will be the first step in a statewide program to document and describe the subsurface geology of the North Carolina Coastal Plain.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 15, 2001

Ground breaking for a new home for the U.S. Geological Survey’s David A. Johnston Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) will take place at 9 a.m., May 18, 2001, exactly 21 years after the climactic 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption that took the life of USGS geologist Dave Johnston. The new building will be located at 1300 SE Cardinal Court, in the Columbia Tech Center, in Vancouver, Wash.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 14, 2001

 

May 14, 2001 – The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS), Yellowstone National Park and the University of Utah have signed an agreement to establish the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory to strengthen long-term monitoring of earthquakes and the slumbering volcano beneath Yellowstone National Park. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 11, 2001

While some folks may make a special effort to ride their bikes to work on the appointed day, May 17, it will be just another day to sit back and take it easy for John Fisher, who lives in Fremont and works as a cartographer at the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 8, 2001

There has been a slight swelling, or uplift, of the ground surface over a broad area of central Oregon, centered five kilometers, or three miles, west of the South Sister volcano in Three Sisters region of the Oregon Cascade Range, according to scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey.