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USGS science for a changing world logo
November 5, 2001

America’s coastal states, the states bordering the Great Lakes, and the Pacific and Caribbean island territories, are experiencing increasingly severe coastal erosion and a variety of other coastal hazards. Most of the hazards are natural, but unwise coastal development and poorly designed manmade alterations have increased the risk of damage to life and property.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 29, 2001

In observance of National Geography Awareness Week, November 11-17, the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park will host a GIS (Geographic Information System) Day event for students of local elementary and high schools.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 26, 2001

Ever wonder what it would be like to fly over the Earth’s surface? Well the U.S. Geological Survey and Florida International University (FIU) today (October 26, 2001) announced a new Internet technology, TerraFly, that will let you interactively fly over the Earth’s surface and explore spatial data such as aerial photography, satellite imagery, street maps and locale information.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 23, 2001

 

The natural richness of the Colorado Plateau of the southwestern United States is the focus of the Sixth Biennial Conference of Research on the Colorado Plateau, November 6-8, at the du Bois Conference Center on the campus of Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, Ariz. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 18, 2001

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is participating in nine of the 14 public workshops scheduled by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) this fall. The Corps of Engineers is conducting the workshops and a series of hearings to receive public comment on their recently released Revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement to the Master Water Control Manual for the Missouri River system.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 8, 2001

WHAT: USGS wildfire research presentations at California’s 2001 Wildfire Conference and Public Events: Ten Years After the East Bay Hills Fire.
WHEN: Thurs., Oct. 11 
WHERE: Scottish Rite Center, 1547 Lakeside Drive, Oakland, Calif. 
WHO: Scientists of the USGS Western Ecological Research Center:

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 8, 2001

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Madison, Wisc., confirmed today that five dead crows found in the St. Louis, Mo., area tested positive for the West Nile Virus. On Thursday, USGS biologists announced that a dead blue jay, found near El Dorado, Ark., also tested positive for the virus. These most recent cases mark the furthest west the virus has been identified in the U.S.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 3, 2001

Saltcedar, an invasive shrub from Eurasia, has the notoriety of siphoning off millions of acre-feet of water from desert aquifers. Its amazing rate of spread, an estimated seven feet per hour, averaged over time, up the Little Colorado River - is difficult to imagine outside of sci-fi flicks.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 2, 2001

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey’s Earthquake Hazards Team will be on site at an open trench on the Hayward Fault, Tuesday, October 2, to explain to city and county officials and transportation managers, the importance of trenching operations to earthquake research, and the latest results of trenching the Hayward Fault. WHEN: October 2, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 25, 2001

By fin and flipper -- this is a manatee that sure knows how to get around! After a five-year disappearance, Chessie, perhaps the most famous and well-traveled manatee along the U.S. Atlantic Coast, has been sighted again in coastal Virginia.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 24, 2001

Geochemical analyses using strontium isotopes show that many of the timbers used to build the prehistoric great houses of Chaco Canyon, N.M., between A.D. 900 and 1150, were hand-carried to the building site from isolated mountaintops 50 to 60 miles away, according to four Arizona scientists.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 20, 2001

Anne Kinsinger, a biologist and administrator with the U.S. Geological Survey for the past nine years, is now serving as "regional biologist" for that Department of the Interior agency. Her office is located in the USGS Western Region office in the Federal Building at 909 First Avenue, in Seattle.