News

News Releases

Browse through a comprehensive list of all USGS national and state news items.

Filter Total Items: 4,572
Date published: February 21, 1996

Wet Winter Replenishes Drought Stressed Reservoirs — Snow Not All Bad

Unusually wet winter weather produced some benefits for several thirsty northeastern cities that experienced severe drought during the summer and fall of 1995. City reservoirs that fell to, or very near, all-time lows have recovered to capacity levels according to data compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey.

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Date published: February 2, 1996

Seismic Crisis Over, But Hazards Remain At Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Air quality conditions at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park remain potentially hazardous today (Feb. 2, 1996) in the wake of an upwelling of molten lava at Kilauea volcano yesterday.

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Date published: January 25, 1996

Chesapeake Bay Inflow Set January Record

Snowmelt followed by rains have resulted in record freshwater inflow to the Chesapeake

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Date published: January 23, 1996

How Do I Tell My Employees They Are Not Essential

If the Federal Government shuts down again, I have no idea how I will explain to my employees -- the highly talented and dedicated men and women of the U.S. Geological Survey -- why they are no longer considered essential to the well-being and future of the United States. The problem is, I don’t believe it for a minute myself.

Date published: January 22, 1996

Near-Record Flooding Documented in Northeast

Flooding on major rivers in the northeastern U.S. during the past weekend, particularly in West Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania, produced near-record flows according to measurements by the U.S. Geological Survey.

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Date published: January 19, 1996

In the Northeast: Lots of Snow Equals Lots of Water

The good news is that the slow melting of the heavy snowpack in the Northeast could release millions of gallons of water to help replenish streams and ground-water levels that have been running below normal in many areas of the Northeastern U.S.

Date published: December 31, 1995

Archived National News Releases for 1995

Web-archive copies of all 1995 National news releases.

Date published: December 11, 1995

MARS MYSTERY: WHERE’S THE CLAY?

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey are saying "Where’s the clay?" as they examine new data on the mineral composition of Mars. The amount of clay minerals on the surface of Mars is much lower than expected, and these low values may provide another clue to deciphering the mystery concerning life on Mars.

Date published: December 7, 1995

POTOMAC FLOW TWICE NORMAL IN NOVEMBER

Flow of the Potomac River near Washington, D.C., was more than twice the average flow for November, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

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Date published: November 30, 1995

WASHINGTON FLOOD EXCEEDS 100-YEAR RECURRENCE LEVELS

Flood waters are peaking and beginning to recede in the Seattle-Tacoma, Washington, area according to streamflow specialists of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), a science agency of the Department of the Interior.

Date published: November 21, 1995

NEW ATLAS LOOKS AT GROUND-WATER RESOURCES OF FIVE STATES

The most important ground-water problems in the states of Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky and Tennessee are probably high concentrations of dissolved solids and large water-level declines near wells that pump large amounts of water from the aquifers (underground water-bearing rock layers), according to a new report by the U.S. Geological Survey.

Date published: November 21, 1995

TEXAS STILL THE PLACE FOR TURKEYS

A quick computer search of the nearly 2 million official place names in the United States shows that Texas is still the state with the most geographic features named "Turkey." From "Turkey Creek" to "Turkeyroost Mountain," Texas has 175 features named after the holiday bird, an addition of one since the last check in 1982. Arizona is second with 134 turkey names.