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Browse through a comprehensive list of all USGS national and state news items.

Filter Total Items: 4,571
Date published: December 16, 1997

Mysterious Disease First Identified in Arkansas, Now Found in Georgia and North Carolina

A mysterious disease that has killed bald eagles and American coots in southwest Arkansas may now be present in two other states, according to wildlife disease specialists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wisconsin.

Date published: December 12, 1997

Update on Alabama Seismic Event

Further analysis by U.S. Geological Survey seismologists has confirmed that the seismic waves recorded earlier today (corrected time: 3:42 am EST) were generated by the collapse of a mine. The longwall coal mine, is located 35 miles east northeast of Tuscaloosa, Alabama. No other damage or injuries occurred. Shaking was felt only in the immediate vicinity of the mine.

Date published: December 10, 1997

Yellowstone Earth Movements Compared to Heavy Breathing

Yellowstone National Park, the land of pristine scenery and wildlife, also "breathes" according to recent research. On Wednesday, December 10, Kenneth L. Pierce of the U.S. Geological Survey in Denver, Colo. will present geologic evidence showing that the central part of Yellowstone has been uplifting and subsiding or "breathing" about five times over the last 9,000 years.

Date published: December 10, 1997

Just in time for Santa...Permafrost Map of North Polar Region Makes Debut in San Francisco

A striking full-color map showing permafrost and ground ice over the Arctic and surrounding continental land masses has been released by the U.S. Geological Survey and will be displayed at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco this week. 

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Date published: December 10, 1997

Log on to Natural Hazards... Before They Become Disasters: USGS Scientists to Describe Their Agency’s Real-Time Monitoring of Natural Hazards

The ability to learn the magnitude and location of an earthquake almost as it’s happening and track rising flood waters are examples of the kind of "real-time" monitoring that enables anyone with a personal computer and access to the Internet to obtain information about natural hazards as they occur.

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Date published: December 10, 1997

USGS Real-Time, Flood-Monitoring Network Described in Special AGU Hazards Session

They don’t have bells and whistles, and you’ll probably never see one on "Baywatch," but the U.S. Geological Survey’s real-time, telemetered stream-gauges are proving their worth when it comes to saving lives and lessening flood damage

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Date published: December 9, 1997

Underground Flow of Nitrate Complicates Chesapeake Bay Cleanup

About half the high nitrate concentrations in nontidal streams and rivers that contribute to the decline of fish populations in Chesapeake Bay come from underground sources, according to research findings presented by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) today (Dec 9. 1997).

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Date published: December 8, 1997

Future energy source, greenhouse gas, drilling hazard ... USGS Scientists Describe Latest on Gas Hydrates

Scientists are taking another look at methane in gas hydrate, which contains perhaps twice as much organic carbon as all fossil fuels on earth. This gas may prove to be an energy resource for the future.

Date published: December 8, 1997

Heavy Breathing, Heavy Metals and Hazard Mitigation Are Topics For USGS Scientists at AGU

"Heavy breathing" at Yellowstone and heavy metals in the nation’s surface and ground-water are two subjects of more than 100 oral and poster presentations by scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, at the annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in San Francisco, Dec. 8-12.

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Date published: December 7, 1997

Shaded-Relief Views of the Floor of San Francisco Bay on Display Tuesday at Moscone

Otis Redding may have waxed eloquently about "Sitting By the Dock of the Bay," but its flying over the floor of San Francisco Bay that has scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey humming a happy tune these days.

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Date published: December 7, 1997

Hayward Fault Is Still the Most Dangerous

The Hayward Fault is still the most dangerous earthquake fault in the San Francisco Bay area, according to U.S. Geological Survey scientists who will present the results from their latest research on that fault at the annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union, in San Francisco this week.

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Date published: December 3, 1997

Free USGS Public Lecture in December

Free public lecture: U.S. Geological Survey Geologist Henry Moore presents the latest "dirt" on Mars; viewing Mars from Sojourner at 7 P.M. in the City Council Chambers, 701 Laurel Street, Menlo Park, Calif.

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