News

News Releases

Browse through a comprehensive list of all USGS national and state news items.

Filter Total Items: 4,589
Date published: May 29, 1997

USGS Maps Available at National Trails Day Festival in Alameda

Selected, local editions of U.S. Geological Survey topographic maps will be available for purchase at the USGS exhibit that will be part of the San Francisco Bay Trail Project’s National Trails Day Festival, Saturday, June 7, at Robert Crown Memorial State Beach and Crab Cove Visitor’s Center in Alameda.

Attribution:
Date published: May 27, 1997

Midwest Earthquakes, High-Flying Fault Finders and the Health of the Chesapeake Bay...

Highlights of Some U.S. Geological Survey papers at the:
Spring Meeting, American Geophysical Union

Attribution:
Date published: May 27, 1997

Scientists Describe Upcoming Earthquake Research Project Set for Puget Sound

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geological Survey of Canada and several universities in both countries are preparing for a 1998 scientific project that will greatly advance the understanding of hazards from shallow earthquakes in the region of Puget Sound and Georgia Strait.

Date published: May 27, 1997

Media Advisory: News Conference to Outline Earthquake Research Project

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, the Canadian Geological Survey, the University of Washington, Oregon State University, the University of British Columbia, the University of Victoria and the University of Texas, El Paso, will hold a news conference Thursday, May 29, 1997, to describe a seismic-imaging research project planned for the Puget Sound area in March 1998.

Date published: May 27, 1997

The Bay’s Attic is in the Basement... Scientists Seek Clues to Past and Future of the Chesapeake Bay

Several dozen scientists will gather in Baltimore on Tuesday and Wednesday (May 27-28) to compare results on efforts to better understand environmental change in the Chesapeake Bay by looking at both current trends and geologic evidence of past changes.

Attribution:
Date published: May 20, 1997

Portland, Ore., Rail Tunnel Serves as Science Lab

A light-rail tunnel under construction in Portland, Ore., is doing double duty as a site to help scientists learn more about earthquake hazards in the area, according to one of the scientists who worked on the project.

Date published: May 20, 1997

New Fed/Private Partnership... Putting Every Backyard on the Internet

The Nation’s largest civilian mapping agency and one of the world’s largest software companies have joined in a partnership to make detailed images of local neighborhoods available free to the public via the Internet.

Date published: May 15, 1997

Striking USGS Image Shows Alaska In A New Light

A computer-generated map published by the U.S. Geological Survey provides a striking portrayal of Alaska’s varied landscape.

Attribution: Region 11: Alaska
Date published: May 14, 1997

MEDIA ADVISORY: USGS Director To Speak at Johnston Ridge Ceremony

Dr. Gordon Eaton, Director of the U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Va., will be one of the featured speakers at the Saturday, May 17, dedication of the Johnston Ridge Observatory in the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument.

Date published: May 14, 1997

Who Was David Johnston?

On Saturday, May 17, 1997, representatives of the U.S. Forest Service, the U.S. Geological Survey and the State of Washington will gather on a ridge on the north slope of Mount St. Helens to dedicate the "Johnston Ridge Observatory of the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument."

Date published: May 14, 1997

NEWS MEDIA ADVISORY—Scanning the Sea Floor off Manhattan

Observe sidescan sonar images of the sea floor being collected and processed by U.S. Geological Survey oceanographer Dr. William Schwab and colleagues on board the "Diane G," tomorrow (Thurs., May 15, 1997).

Attribution:
Date published: May 6, 1997

As The Red River Floodwaters Recede, USGS Continues Measuring Flood Effects With Cooperation of State Agencies

Even as the floodwaters of the Red River of the North continue to recede, and residents begin to deal with the aftermath of the unprecedented nature of this rare flood, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with several bi-state agencies, is making additional streamflow and water-quality measurements to assess the overall impact of the flood.