News

News Releases

Browse through a comprehensive list of all USGS national and state news items.

Filter Total Items: 2,917
USGS science for a changing world logo
March 5, 2001

With more than 35,000 estimated deaths from earthquakes in the first two months of 2001, it may seem like the earth is more restless than usual. Not so, according to scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) in Golden, Colo.

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 2, 2001

Advanced seismic monitoring, long term research, a commitment to hazard preparedness and mitigation and some good luck all played a role in ensuring that yesterday’s earthquake near Seattle was not more devastating.

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 1, 2001

A minor aftershock struck the Seattle area early Thursday morning, March 1, 2001. The aftershock, which struck at 1:10 a.m. local time, had a preliminary magnitude of 3.4 and was felt throughout the Seattle-Tacoma-Olympia area.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 28, 2001

A strong earthquake, with a preliminary magnitude of 6.8, struck near Olympia, Washington, south of Seattle, at 10:55 a.m. PST on February 28, 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey reported.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 23, 2001

A new U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessment of the nation’s coal resources shows abundant high quality, low-sulfur coal on federal and private lands in the Colorado Plateau region of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah. The area is also home to vast quantities of coal bed methane gas - natural gas contained in coal.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 22, 2001

Biological wildfire. The green cancer. For invasive plants, scientists say, these labels may even be understatements since, over time, non-native plant invasions can spread to unmanageable levels, often leaving extinctions and altered ecosystems in their wake. And, they cost the U.S. billions of dollars annually while presenting an ecological threat that researchers say is second only to habitat d

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 21, 2001

U.S. output of mineral-based materials contributed nearly $429 billion to support the nation’s economy in 2000, according to a new report from the U.S. Geological Survey.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 20, 2001

A twin-engine airplane, operated under contract to the U.S. Geological Survey, will be flying low-altitude geophysical surveys over an area west of San Antonio beginning around February 24, 2001. The survey will cover parts of Uvalde, Medina and Bexar counties. The survey should be completed in about four weeks, weather permitting.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 19, 2001

Like the Florida Everglades, California’s Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta has been radically transformed by human activities. In the past three decades, monitoring programs have documented remarkable declines in living resources from primary producers to fish. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 13, 2001

 

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has named Donna Myers to be its Great Lakes Coordinator. Ms. Myers filled this newly created position beginning in January 2001. The goal of the position is to promote the integration of the biological sciences, geology, mapping, and water programs in the Great Lakes Basin to better serve the needs of natural resource managers.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 5, 2001

Aerial photographs supplied to the Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Search and Rescue Team, by the U.S. Geological Survey, are being used to search for the remains of Xiana Fairchild. A child’s skull, which was found near Lexington Reservoir on January 19, has been identified through dental records and DNA tests, as that of the missing 7-year-old Vallejo girl who disappeared in December 1999.

USGS science for a changing world logo
January 29, 2001

Environmental clean-up crews are working this morning to determine the size of an oil release that occurred at the U.S. Geological Survey Headquarters in Reston, Va., early this morning.