USGS Measures Local Impacts of Tropical Depression Bill

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Several U.S. Geological Survey field crews are measuring flooding in south-central Oklahoma due to heavy rainfall from the remnants of Tropical Depression Bill.

Reporters: Do you want to accompany a USGS field crew as they measure flooding? Please contact Heidi Koontz or Bill Andrews.

Several U.S. Geological Survey field crews are measuring flooding in south-central Oklahoma due to heavy rainfall from the remnants of Tropical Depression Bill.

The slow-moving weather system has dropped between 5 and 11 inches of rainfall between Ardmore and Duncan and as far north as Henrietta, Oklahoma. Flood stages at USGS-operated streamgages have been exceeded at several locations, including Red River near Burkburnett, Texas; the Washita River at Anadarko, Oklahoma and near Dickson, Oklahoma; the Little River near Tecumseh, Oklahoma; and the North Canadian River near Wetumka, Oklahoma.

 Stages of many streams and rivers in eastern Oklahoma are likely to be above normal into the coming weekend. Flood-prone areas, including highways, may be affected by rising waters. High streamflows and velocities during this event can cause substantial damage to property in the floodplains of these streams. 

USGS scientists are collecting critical streamflow data that are vital for protection of life, property and the environment. These data are used by the National Weather Service to develop flood forecasts, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to manage flood control and state and local agencies in their flood response activities. To monitor Oklahoma stream stages and discharges near you, please use the streamgage map. USGS maps of flood and high flow conditions for Oklahoma may also be accessed online.

More real-time information is available on the USGS Oklahoma National Streamflow Information website.

There are 188 USGS-operated streamgages in Oklahoma that measure water levels, streamflow and rainfall. When flooding occurs, USGS crews make numerous discharge measurements to verify the data USGS provides to federal, state and local agencies, as well as to the public.

For more than 125 years, the USGS has monitored flow in selected streams and rivers across the U.S. The information is routinely used for water supply and management, monitoring floods and droughts, bridge and road design, determination of flood risk, and for many recreational activities.

Receive instant, customized updates about water conditions in your area via text message or email by signing up for USGS WaterAlert. See where floodwaters go by following a stream trace at Streamer. View water data on your mobile device. Learn how a USGS streamgage works.