USGS Scientist Dr. Craig D. Allen Named Ecological Society of America Fellow

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The U.S. Geological Survey is celebrating the achievements of Dr. Craig D. Allen, who was recently named an Ecological Society of America (ESA) fellow for making exceptional contributions to a broad array of ecology. Dr. Allen, a research ecologist with the USGS Fort Collins Science Center, joins 27 other newly-initiated ESA fellows from academia, public and private sectors. Fellows are elected for life.

Dr. Allen’s fellowship will be awarded at the 103rd  annual ESA meeting, held in New Orleans, Louisiana August 5-10, 2018.

 

ESA fellows are members who have made outstanding contributions to a wide range of fields served by ESA, including, but not restricted to, those that advance or apply ecological knowledge in academics, government, non-profit organizations, and the broader society.

 

“Craig Allen’s contributions to the field of ecology, particularly in landscapes of the Southwest, is unparalleled,” said Anne Kinsinger, USGS Associate Director for Ecosystems. “His work is a model of collaborative research, bringing many colleagues and collaborators to the table to understand critical issues like climate-induced tree mortality, ecological and fire histories in the southwest U.S., and the effects of recent fires on southwestern landscapes.”

 

Dr. Allen, who leads the USGS New Mexico Landscapes Field Station based at Bandelier National Monument, was elected for advancing core understanding of forest disturbance ecology, particularly through leadership that uncovered emerging patterns of forest die-off around the globe in response to drought and heat with associated pests and pathogens, and associated patterns in wildfire, demonstrating the value of place-based ecology in a global perspective.

 

His research has been highlighted in numerous media outlets, including National Geographic, New York Times, NPR and NOVA. He has authored more than 100 publications on landscape ecology and landscape change, from fire history and forest ecology to ecosystem responses to climate change. 

 

“It’s been a great pleasure to have had the opportunity to work for decades as a place-based ecological researcher in the mountain landscapes of northern New Mexico, partnered with land managers to develop long-term knowledge of ecosystem dynamics and applications to diverse environmental challenges,” said Allen, who’s been with the USGS since 1996.

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