Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

Multimedia

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April 29, 2019

Timelapse sequence shows a typical day at Mauna Loa's summit

This timelapse sequence of webcam images over a 24-hour period shows a typical day at the summit of Mauna Loa. The webcam (MLcam) is located on the northeast rim of Moku‘āweoweo, Mauna Loa's summit caldera. This sequence begins in the dark, with the moon rising (white dot at left in images), then brightens as the sun rises. Clear skies in the morning shift to cloudy

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floor of Mauna Loa caldera floor with blue sky in the background
April 24, 2019

Mauna Loa caldera

HVO staff visited the summit of Mauna Loa on foot to repair the webcam on April 24. The weather was perfectly clear and views of the caldera floor showed nothing unusual.

HVO geologist walks along the Mauna Loa summit trail
April 24, 2019

HVO geologist walks along the Mauna Loa summit trail

An HVO geologist walks along the Mauna Loa summit trail, with Mauna Kea visible in the distant background.

HVO scientists inspect a seismic station on Mauna Loa
April 12, 2019

HVO scientists inspect a seismic station on Mauna Loa

HVO scientists inspect a seismic station on Mauna Loa to evaluate for a possible equipment upgrade in the near future.

HVO scientists measure a GPS instrument
April 12, 2019

HVO scientists measure a GPS instrument

HVO scientists measure a GPS instrument to ensure its stability during a multi-day deployment in the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. In recent weeks, HVO has been working to complete a GPS campaign on Mauna Loa, which involves temporary deployments of high-precision GPS receivers to collect data that will help refine models of the volcano's inflation.

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high-precision GPS unit
April 11, 2019

high-precision GPS unit

A high-precision GPS unit (on white "T" in foreground) records its position at a ground control point along Pohoiki Road. This marker was painted in July 2018 and is visible in numerous aerial photographs taken by USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists throughout Kīlauea's lower East Rift Zone eruption last summer. GPS data are recorded over a period of four minutes

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April 8, 2019

Overflight of Kīlauea Caldera

This wide-angle video shows the southwest portion of Kīlauea caldera in the area of Halema‘uma‘u. Faint plumes of volcanic gas are rising from yellow fumaroles on the walls of the deep conical pit. Overall, no significant changes were observed at the summit on today's overflight.

GPS station on Mauna Loa
March 27, 2019

GPS survey is completed annually on Mauna Loa

A high-precision Global Positioning System (GPS) survey is completed annually on Mauna Loa. This station was occupied for a period of three days to supplement the continuously operating GPS stations on the volcano. A beautiful view of Mauna Kea (in distance) could seen from this site during the GPS survey. 

 small amounts of sulfur dioxide
March 22, 2019

small amounts of sulfur dioxide

Only small amounts of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are currently being released from Kīlauea, but they chemically react with each other (oxidation-reduction reaction) to form the bright yellow sulfur deposits visible on the crater walls within Halema‘uma‘u. The current low sulfur emission rates at Kīlauea have contributed to

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March 19, 2019

3D Model of Pu`u `Ō`ō

This 3D model of the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater was constructed from thermal images taken during a recent helicopter overflight. White areas show warm spots in the crater. Despite the absence of active lava in Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, changes at the crater have continued since magma drained from beneath it on April 30, 2018. The shape of the crater continues to change through occasional small

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March 18, 2019

Rockfalls continue to change the shape of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater

This video was taken during an overflight of the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater on Kīlauea Volcano's middle East Rift Zone. No major changes were observed, but the shape of the crater continues to be altered by continued rockfalls.

Hawaii that extend offshore
February 28, 2019

Hawaii that extend offshore

Many of the earthquakes in Hawaii that extend offshore and up the island chain are due to plate bending, or flexure. The upper panel shows magnitude-5 and greater earthquakes since 1861, with some notable events labeled. The area of maximum flexural stress is within about 100 km (62 mi) from where the Island of Hawai‘i loads the plate, but also extends about 300 km (186 mi

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