Data and Tools

Natural Hazards

Natural hazard science is the study of coastal and marine geology, earthquake hazards, geomagnetism, landslides, volcanoes, seismological and geophysical sensors, floods, and more.

Filter Total Items: 129
Date published: June 20, 2018

USGS SWaTH Network

SWaTH is a system of flood-hardened, real-time telemetered tide gages, rapid deployment gages, and storm tide sensors deployed in integrated network configurations along the Northeastern Atlantic Coast from North Carolina to Maine.

Date published: June 19, 2018

Aerial imagery and photogrammetric products from unmanned aerial systems (UAS) flights over the Lake Ontario shoreline at Sodus Bay, New York, July 12 to 14, 2017

 This data release includes images tagged with locations determined from the UAS GPS; tables with updated estimates of camera positions and attitudes based on the photogrammetric reconstruction; tables listing locations of the base stations, ground control points, and transect points; geolocated, RGB-colored point clouds; orthomosaic images; and digital elevation models for each of the regions...

Date published: June 18, 2018

Latest Earthquakes - Hawaii

Latest earthquakes map and list. Tap/click on "gear icon" for options and settings.

Attribution: Earthquake Hazards
Date published: June 15, 2018

Our Coast Our Future

Our Coast, Our Future (OCOF) is a collaborative, user-driven project focused on providing California coastal resource managers and planners locally relevant, online maps and tools to help understand, visualize, and anticipate vulnerabilities to sea level rise and storms.

Date published: May 17, 2018

USGS Coastal and Marine Geoscience Data System

Provides information and access to the published data of the Coastal and Marine Geology Program. 

Date published: May 8, 2018

Seismic reflection and sample data collected offshore of Fire Island, New York in 2014, U.S. Geological Field Activity 2014-009-FA

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a geophysical and sampling survey in October 2014 that focused on a series of shoreface-attached ridges offshore of western Fire Island, NY. Seismic-reflection data, surficial grab samples and bottom photographs and video were collected along the lower shoreface and inner continental shelf to assess the impact of Hurricane Sandy on the coastal region...

Date published: April 12, 2018

HayWired aftershock (M> 5) ShakeMaps

The maps in this archive display estimated intensities and ground motions for the earthquake scenarios - events on faults that have ruptured in the past or have a likelihood of rupturing in the future. These maps are typically used for emergency response exercises and planning as well as for understanding the potential consequences of future large earthquakes.

Attribution: Natural Hazards
Date published: April 12, 2018

The HayWired Scenario: An Urban Earthquake in a Connected World - A Geonarrative

What might it be like the next time the Hayward Fault has a large earthquake? A geonarrative and related imagery examines a hypothetical earthquake, the magnitude 7.0 HayWired earthquake scenario.”

Attribution: Natural Hazards
Date published: April 12, 2018

What to Expect in a Big Urban Earthquake - A Geonarrative

How do we get ready for big earthquakes in populated areas? An important first step is to learn what a big earthquake could be like. These pages summarize the main patterns — the earthquake effects that show up again and again. Here, urban is shorthand for “cities, towns, and suburbs”.

Date published: April 9, 2018

Marsh shorelines of the Massachusetts coast from 2013-14 topographic lidar data

The Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) launched the Shoreline Change Project in 1989 to identify erosion-prone areas of the Massachusetts coast. This update included a marsh shoreline, which was defined to be the tonal difference between low- and high-marsh seen in ortho-photos. Further cooperation between CZM and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has resulted in another...

Date published: April 6, 2018

Collection, analysis, and age-dating of sediment cores from salt marshes on the south shore of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, from 2013 through 2014

Elevation of the marsh surface was measured with RTK-GPS to evaluate where the marsh falls within the current tidal frame. The historic marsh surface elevation was then reconstructed using the calculated age of each depth interval and its elevation, assuming that elevations within this shallow zone (less than 30 cm) have been preserved for the past century.

 

Date published: April 4, 2018

U.S. Geological Survey Oceanographic Time-Series Data Collection

Oceanographic time-series measurements made by the U.S. Geological Survey between 1975 and the present as part of research programs. The data were collected to address specific research questions and were primarily collected over durations less than a year, using stationary platforms, with sensors near the sea floor. These data have been used to study of ocean dynamics and to validate ocean...