Data and Tools

Water

Get current water conditions that are important to you, such as water levels, streamflow, temperatures, and more.

Filter Total Items: 159
Date published: August 8, 2018

Water use in the U.S., 2015

How do we use water in the U.S.?

We all depend on water every day, ranging from the water from our faucets, to the food we eat, to much of the electricity we use. The U.S. and its territories used nearly 322 billion gallons of water per day in 2015. This would cover the continental U.S. in about two inches of water over the course of a year. The national breakdown of...

Date published: August 8, 2018

USGS Water Use Data for the Nation

National water-use data are reported by source (surface water or groundwater, fresh and saline, and total), and category for the United States as a whole. The water-use data presented here are the current best estimates, and may have been revised from previous publications.

Date published: July 17, 2018

Blacks Fork synoptic sampling sites

Streamflow and water-quality samples collected during 2018 and 2019

Date published: July 5, 2018

Coastal Change Hazards Portal

Interactive access to coastal change science and data for our Nation’s coasts. Information and products are organized within three coastal change hazard themes: 1) extreme storms, 2) shoreline change, and 3) sea-level rise. Each data item represents an individual research product, with some items grouped together as aggregates to show the breadth of the topic and make it easy to explore.

Date published: July 5, 2018

Key Findings for Scenario-Based Assessment for Hurricanes

Percentage of sandy beaches very likely (probability > 0.9) to experience erosion associated with collision, overwash, and inundation during category 1-5 hurricane landfall.

Date published: July 5, 2018

Oblique Aerial Photography Viewer

Obique photos offer a unique perspective of the coast. Features such as beach erosion or accretion, dune erosion and overwash can all be clearly characterized in this imagery. It also documents coastal infrastructure, as well as the damage that infrastructure may incur as the result of an impacting hurricane. 

Date published: July 5, 2018

USGS Flood Inundation Mapper

USGS Flood Inundation Maps , along with Internet information regarding current stage from the USGS streamgage, provide emergency management personnel and residents with information that is critical for flood-response activities, such as evacuations and road closures, as well as for post-flood recovery efforts.

Date published: June 20, 2018

U.S. Water Use from 1950-2015

How much water do we use?
In the map below, State size (area) is scaled proportionally to State freshwater use.

Date published: June 20, 2018

USGS Surface-Water Data for New Jersey

Nationally, USGS surface-water data includes more than 850,000 station years of time-series data that describe stream levels, streamflow (discharge), reservoir and lake levels, surface-water quality, and rainfall. The data are collected by automatic recorders and manual field measurements at installations across the Nation.

Date published: June 19, 2018

Water Watch - National

WaterWatch is a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) World Wide Web site that displays maps, graphs, and tables describing real-time, recent, and past streamflow conditions for the United States. 

Date published: May 11, 2018

National Water Information System web interface (NWISweb)

The USGS investigates the occurrence, quantity, quality, distribution, and movement of surface and underground waters. NWIS provides access to real-time and historical water-resources data collected at approximately 1.9 million sites in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

Attribution: Water Resources
Date published: April 23, 2018

Surface-water data for Connecticut

Real-time, daily, peak-flow, field measurements, and statistics of current and historical data that describe stream levels, streamflow (discharge), reservoir and lake levels, surface-water quality, and rainfall in Connecticut. Surface-water data are collected and stored as either discrete field-water-level measurements or as continuous time-series data from automated recorders.