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Check out web tools that include alert and notification services, data access, data analysis, data visualizations, digital repositories, and interactive maps.

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APIs

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Data Access Tools

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Data Analysis Tools

Data Visualizations

Data Visualizations

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Digital Repositories

Interactive Maps

Interactive Maps

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Filter Total Items: 183

Geomag Plots

View data plots from geomagnetic observatories in near-realtime.

Bear Lake Water-Quality Data Visualizations

Displaying water-quality data with depth over time at a single location has always presented a challenge. These data visualizations were developed as a response to that issue by Katherine Jones, USGS Office of Quality Assurance.

Mauna Loa - Preparing for the next eruption of Earth's largest active volcano

This geonarrative provides an overview of Mauna Loa’s eruptive history and hazards and includes interactive maps and datasets to help residents prepare for the next eruption.

Arctic Rivers Project: Connecting Indigenous knowledge and western science to strengthen collective understanding of the changing Arctic

The Arctic Rivers Project will weave together Indigenous knowledges, monitoring, and the modeling of climate, rivers (flows, temperature, ice), and fish to improve understanding of how Arctic rivers, ice transportation corridors, fish, and communities might be impacted by and adapt to climate change.

U.S. Groundwater Conditions

The U.S. Groundwater Conditions animated data visualization depicts groundwater levels at 2,281 well sites across the U.S. At each site, groundwater levels are shown relative to the historic record (using percentiles), indicating where groundwater is comparatively high or low to what has been observed in the past. The corresponding time series chart shows the percent of sites in each water-le

Nitrogen Loading from Selected Long Island Sound Tributaries from 1995 to 2016

This dashboard application displays nitrogen concentrations and loads in selected Long Island Sound tributaries. 

Pennsylvania Real-Time Water Quality

Real-time computed concentrations of water-quality constituents such as suspended sediment and fecal coliform bacteria are calculated using ordinary least squares regression models. The results of these models, along with direct water-quality measurements, can be viewed here as time-series graphs, or downloaded as tabular data.

Climate Research & Development Program - 2021 Year in Review

Geonarrative that summarizes research highlights from the Climate Research & Development Program from 2021.

Geonarrative: Coastal Resilience Initiative

The Coastal Resilience Initiative geonarrative is a data-driven, interactive narrative that shares information about the USGS-led Coastal Resilience Initiative while allowing viewers to explore past and ongoing work and access coastal science tools. The Initiative's mission is to provide information to protect lives, property, resources, and the economic well-being of coastal communities in the No

Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units 2020 Year in Review

Our Program is a unique cooperative partnership among State fish and wildlife agencies, universities, the Wildlife Management Institute, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. This story highlights the activities and accomplishments of the program and its cooperators for calendar year 2020.

Chloride Data for Streams in Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island

View recent and historical chloride and specific conductance data for active water-quality monitoring stations on streams in Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island.

Deciphering Nature's Seismograph: How Sediments Record Past Earthquakes and Inform Future Hazard Assessments

People have been recording seismic activity for centuries. To assemble a detailed earthquake history of an area and understand how faults may behave in the future, however, scientists need to go further back in time—from several hundred to many thousands of years ago.