Energy & Wildlife

Filter Total Items: 50
Date published: October 31, 2018
Status: Active

Wildlife Tracking/Telemetry

USGS scientists use tracking/telemetry tags to determine the occurrence and local movement patterns of wildlife. Because energy development often takes place in critical wildlife habitats, scientists can study these wildlife patterns to help guide project siting and operational decisions to areas and practices that present the lowest risk to energy development and wildlife.

Contacts: Mona Khalil
Date published: October 31, 2018
Status: Active

Management Support Tools

USGS scientists build broadly applicable management support tools to assist resource managers and the industry in siting of energy development and selection of off-site mitigation areas.

Contacts: Mona Khalil
Date published: October 31, 2018
Status: Active

Demographic and Population Models

USGS scientists are currently developing models for species of interest that can be overlaid with maps showing areas of potential energy. These models, or map overlays, identify areas of biological strengths and weaknesses or high- and low-quality habitat and can identify opportunities for conservation—areas of high-quality habitat where energy-generating potential is low—and areas of...

Contacts: Mona Khalil
Date published: October 30, 2018
Status: Active

Conservation Planning

Conservation planning tools, such as those listed below, have been developed by USGS scientists to assist resource managers in prioritizing areas for future energy development.

Contacts: Mona Khalil
Date published: October 30, 2018
Status: Active

Fish Migration

 As hydropower dams age and require critical upgrades, USGS hydrologists, engineers and fish biologists work together to design the next generation of dams and operational protocols that improve passage for migratory fish and cause fewer negative effects on upstream and downstream ecosystems.  

Date published: October 30, 2018
Status: Active

Adaptive Management

USGS scientists conduct a combination of short- and longterm biological research, survey and monitoring, data analysis and applications, new tool and technology development and application, decision support, and adaptive management to address energy and wildlife management issues.

Contacts: Mona Khalil
Date published: October 30, 2018
Status: Active

Population Effects

USGS science is helping to understand the potential population effects for a number of wildlife species. Scientists are also developing risk assessment tools to guide energy development to locations where it will have minimal impact on wildlife. 

Contacts: Mona Khalil
Date published: October 30, 2018
Status: Active

Monitoring and Detection

USGS scientists collect data and develop tools and techniques to minimize potential negative effects of new energy development. These tools are critical for supporting management efforts to monitor and improve effectiveness of how facilities are located, built, and operated.

Contacts: Mona Khalil
Date published: October 30, 2018
Status: Active

Mitigation and Compensation

USGS supports the U.S. goal to increase energy production from clean, renewable sources by conducting research into minimizing or mitigating potential negative effects of an expanding renewable energy infrastructure. USGS scientists collect data and develop tools and techniques to minimize potential negative effects of new energy development. Monitoring protocols and habitat-use models are...

Contacts: Mona Khalil
Date published: October 29, 2018
Status: Active

Deterrent Technologies

USGS scientists are testing bird and bat deterrent devices (such as ultrasonic acoustic deterrents) as well as operational management strategies that can cost-effectively reduce wildlife fatalities while allowing wind operators to generate this carbon-free energy.

Contacts: Mona Khalil
Date published: October 29, 2018
Status: Active

Migration and Movement

USGS assists state fish and wildlife agencies, land and wildlife managers, and other stakeholders by producing applied science-based tools to guide wind and solar energy development to locations where it will have minimal impact on wildlife. As a basis for these tools, USGS researchers study the movement and migration of wildlife.

Contacts: Mona Khalil
Date published: October 29, 2018
Status: Active

Fatality Estimation

USGS has made significant strides in addressing research needs identified by resource managers and industry to understand wildlife interactions with turbines, estimate causes and magnitude of fatalities, develop wildlife and mortality survey protocols, assess population effects, describe migrations and movement patterns, and develop potential mitigation measures. USGS also has developed tools...

Contacts: Mona Khalil