Status and Trends Program

Filter Total Items: 57
Date published: February 1, 2018
Status: Active

Bird Banding Laboratory: Recent Accomplishments

The Challenge: Bird banding is one of the most indispensable techniques for studying the movement, survival and behavior of birds. The North American Bird Banding Program was established in 1920 and has evolved into the complex operation that supports the activities of approximately 2,092 Master banders and more than 9,423 subpermittees.

Date published: January 26, 2018

Remote Sensing

USGS scientists are exploring new uses of remote sensing for monitoring and assessment.

Date published: January 26, 2018
Status: Active

Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS)

Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) are an innovative way to provide data for monitoring resources, especially in large-scale or remote landscapes. 

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: January 25, 2018

Arid and Semi-Arid Lands

The Status and Trends Program provides timely, quality science about arid and semi-arid lands to meet the needs of resource management  bureaus within Interior and other science and resource management organizations.

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: January 25, 2018

Estuaries

In the 21st century, drivers such as sea level rise, extreme weather events, changes in the flow rate of rivers, and human development of coastal habitats will affect coastal landscapes and ecosystems across the region, including estuaries.

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: January 25, 2018

Landscape Conservation

The USGS Status and Trends program develops information and tools used by our partners to assess, conserve, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat.

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: January 25, 2018

Habitat

Information about the status and trends of natural resources is required at a variety of spatial and temporal scales to detect changes that may signal degradation or improvement of natural systems, such as habitat, or to identify new or emerging conditions that signal the need for management action or further investigative research.

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: January 24, 2018

Natural Stressors

The status and trends of organisms, habitats and ecosystems is often controlled by environmental and anthropogenic stressors that have the potential to impact the health and productivity of lands and waters of management concern.

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: January 24, 2018

Wetlands

Wetlands provide goods and services that have been valued at up to $78,500 per acre per year (R. Costanza and others, Global  Environmental Change 2014). In addition to providing fish and wildlife habitat, coastal ecosystems protect coastlines from storms, store carbon in sediments, improve water quality, and maintain productive coastal fisheries. In the 21st century, drivers such as sea level...

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: January 24, 2018

Coastal Marine Ecosystems

USGS scientists, in collaboration with key partners, assess ecological patterns and processes within important ecological systems, such as Coastal Marine Ecosystems, to understand the status and trends of organisms and habitats at large spatial scales to support restoration of these important ecological systems.

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: January 23, 2018

Monarchs

We are a leader in the Monarch Conservation Science Partnership (MCSP) which includes a variety of resource management organizations both Federal (including the National Park Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) and non-Federal (including Xerces Society).

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: January 19, 2018

Bats

North American bats face unprecedented threats including habitat loss and fragmentation, white-nose syndrome, wind energy development, and climate change. 

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin