Status and Trends Program

Filter Total Items: 68
Date published: May 1, 2018
Status: Active

Bird Banding Laboratory

The Bird Banding Laboratory (BBL) is an integrated scientific program supporting the collection, archiving, management and dissemination of information from banded and marked birds in North America to monitor the status and trends of resident and migratory bird populations. As birds are good indicators of the health of the environment, the status and trends of bird populations are critical for...

Date published: March 6, 2018
Status: Active

Alpine Wildlife and Snowpack Dynamics in the North Cascades

Mountain ecosystems are expected to change with continued reductions in annual snowpack that have been observed worldwide over the past half-century. Recent snow droughts in North America have been attributed to unusually warm temperatures that cause winter precipitation to fall as rain, rather than snow. Many species of alpine wildlife depend on snowpack for insulation from extreme cold and...

Date published: February 28, 2018
Status: Active

Vulnerability Assessment Frameworks

The USGS Status and Trends program assesses ecological patterns and processes within important ecological systems to understand complex environmental controls over species and ecosystems, and their vulnerability to internal and external stressors and drivers.

 

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: February 28, 2018
Status: Active

Contaminants

Health status can often affect the size and distribution of plant and animals population across landscapes. 

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: February 28, 2018
Status: Active

Sea-Level Rise

Coastal ecosystems greatly influence the livelihood and resilience of coastal communities and cities to external stressors such as storms or sea level change.

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: February 28, 2018
Status: Active

Fire

Successful restoration or rehabilitation of degraded species, habitats and ecosystems requires assessments of the status and trends of the impacted system before, during and after restoration. In addition, an ecological understanding is required to inform changes in resource management activities to support restoration, as well as to assess the relative success of the restoration and to adjust...

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: February 26, 2018
Status: Active

Decision Frameworks

Decision frameworks bring science and stakeholders needs together to determine the best way to manage natural resources.

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: February 26, 2018
Status: Active

Biological Collections

Biological collections provide critical data to assess the history of the status, population trends, and abundance of the plants and animals around us. 

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: February 26, 2018
Status: Active

Citizen Science

Citizen science — scientific work undertaken by members of the general public, usually in collaboration with scientific institutions — is a grassroots approach to natural science. It educates and engages the public by encouraging ordinary citizens to use their interests and their talents in tackling a wide range of real-world problems. 

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: February 26, 2018
Status: Active

Ecosystem Services

Ecosystem services are the benefits that ecosystems provide that are valued by human users such as food, fresh water, and cultural services. Ecosystems also provide marketable goods like seafood and timber.

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: February 26, 2018
Status: Active

Adaptive Assessments

The Status and Trends program is using adaptive assessments to understand the current condition of plants, animals, and habitats then structuring management decisions around the information learned.

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: February 22, 2018
Status: Active

Data Analysis, Synthesis, and Delivery

The Status and Trends program provides research, technological tools, and decision support to meet the science needs of the Nation's resource managers to conserve and protect aquatic species, communities, and habitats.

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin