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A group of researchers from across the USGS Coastal Change Hazards community will present on, “Providing Data and Tools for Resilient Coastal Resources, Communities, and Economies” to highlight how USGS provides information to help protect lives, property, and the economic well-being of the Nation.

This event has concluded. Watch the recording in Microsoft Teams.

DOI Office of Policy Analysis Seminar. Providing Data and Tools for Resilient Coastal Resources, Communities, and Economies.
Flyer for DOI Seminar on Providing Data and Tools for Resilient Coastal Resources, Communities, and Economies. 

 

Coasts are threatened by sea-level rise, extreme storms, erosion, and loss of ecosystems. The DOI has a broad range of stewardship responsibilities related to managing coastal resources that communities and the Nation depend on. Scientific understanding of these threats and forecasting their potential impacts are crucial for providing robust information to guide coastal restoration and management strategies, including an emphasis on underserved communities. USGS coastal science has helped address coastal management challenges in national parks, refuges, and other coastal areas. In this seminar, you will hear about coastal modeling and forecasting of storm and sea-level rise impacts, balancing sediment management with ecosystem and coastal resiliency, assessing landscape change with new imaging technologies, and evaluating impacts of coral reef degradation and sediment availability. Learn how USGS is working to share this knowledge with DOI and other stakeholders.   

The DOI Office of Policy Analysis holds this public monthly seminar to showcase recent work and achievements that contribute to DOI’s mission. The work of the USGS Coastal Change Hazards team contributes science and knowledge to support several DOI priorities such as America the Beautiful—spotlighting the work to restore and conserve America’s lands and waters, Investing in America’s Infrastructure through ecosystem restoration and scientific innovation, and Tackling the Climate Crisis by protecting public health and the environment, restoring science, and building resilience against the impacts of climate change (EO 13990, EO 14008, EO 14008). 

Join us Monday, June 13th for our Coastal Change Hazards panel: 

  • Meg Palmsten - Forecasting coastal change hazards  

  • Davina Passeri - Modeling future sea-level rise and storm impacts to guide restoration  

  • Jen Miselis - Balancing sediment management with ecosystem and coastal resiliency  

  • Jon Warrick - Assessing landscape change using new imaging technologies  

  • Lauren Toth - Vulnerability of reef-lined coasts to natural hazards