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Landslide Hazards Program

The primary objective of the National Landslide Hazards Program is to reduce long-term losses from landslide hazards by improving our understanding of the causes of ground failure and suggesting mitigation strategies.

News

From Ashes to Alerts: Science Helps Protect Colorado Travelers

From Ashes to Alerts: Science Helps Protect Colorado Travelers

USGS Seeks Landslide Risk Reduction Proposals

USGS Seeks Landslide Risk Reduction Proposals

Assessing landslide risks in Prince William Sound 

Assessing landslide risks in Prince William Sound 

Publications

Evaluation of debris-flow building damage forecasts

Reliable forecasts of building damage due to debris flows may provide situational awareness and guide land and emergency management decisions. Application of debris-flow runout models to generate such forecasts requires combining hazard intensity predictions with fragility functions that link hazard intensity with building damage. In this study, we evaluated the performance of building damage fore
Authors
Katherine R. Barnhart, Christopher R. Miller, Francis K. Rengers, Jason W. Kean

Satellite Interferometry Landslide Detection and Preliminary Tsunamigenic Plausibility Assessment in Prince William Sound, Southcentral Alaska

Regional mapping of actively deforming landslides, including measurements of landslide velocity, is integral for hazard assessments in paraglacial environments. These inventories are also critical for describing the potential impacts that the warming effects of climate change have on slope instability in mountainous and cryospheric terrain. The objective of this study is to identify slow-moving la

Authors
Lauren N. Schaefer, Jinwook Kim, Dennis M. Staley, Zhong Lu, Katherine R. Barnhart

The 2022 Chaos Canyon landslide in Colorado: Insights revealed by seismic analysis, field investigations, and remote sensing

An unusual, high-alpine, rapid debris slide originating in ice-rich debris occurred on June 28, 2022, at 16:33:16 MDT at the head of Chaos Canyon, a formerly glacier-covered valley in Rocky Mountain National Park, CO, USA. In this study, we integrate eyewitness videos and seismic records of the event with meteorological data, field observations, pre- and post-event satellite imagery, and uncrewed
Authors
Kate E. Allstadt, Jeffrey A. Coe, Elaine Collins, Francis K. Rengers, Anne Mangeney, Scott M. Esser, Jana Pursley, William L. Yeck, John Bellini, Lance R. Brady

Science

Landslide Mechanisms and Forecasting

When and where will landslides happen? How far will they go, how big and how fast will they be? These questions are difficult to answer because many factors contribute to landslide occurrence, magnitude, and mobility; some factors remain unknown, while nearly all are very difficult to quantify and account for. Researchers use surface, subsurface, remote sensing, and laboratory observations along...
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Landslide Mechanisms and Forecasting

When and where will landslides happen? How far will they go, how big and how fast will they be? These questions are difficult to answer because many factors contribute to landslide occurrence, magnitude, and mobility; some factors remain unknown, while nearly all are very difficult to quantify and account for. Researchers use surface, subsurface, remote sensing, and laboratory observations along...
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Las Lomas Landslide Monitoring Station - Recent Conditions

Recent Monitoring Data
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Postfire Landslide Monitoring Station: “Las Lomas” (2016 Fish Fire) near Duarte, California

Wildfire can increase landslide susceptibility in mountainous terrain. The USGS maintains postfire landslide monitoring stations to track hillslope hydrologic conditions in the years following fire.
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Postfire Landslide Monitoring Station: “Las Lomas” (2016 Fish Fire) near Duarte, California

Wildfire can increase landslide susceptibility in mountainous terrain. The USGS maintains postfire landslide monitoring stations to track hillslope hydrologic conditions in the years following fire.
Learn More