Southwest

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Red spotted toad.
March 15, 2016

FORT is monitoring populations of amphibians at three apex sites using capture-recapture methods. Our goal in monitoring populations is to detect fluctuations in population size, sex ratio, survival, and recruitment. Through long-term monitoring, we can also address breeding phenology in relation to elevation, weather, and climate. Other specific questions can be asked about issues such as breeding behavior, disease, and use of habitat. We are monitoring boreal toad populations and wood frogs in Rocky Mountain National Park and chorus frogs at Cameron Pass in Northern Colorado. In collaboration with the NOROCK team and David Pilliod, we are monitoring a site in Wyoming where boreal toads appear to be surviving, and thriving in spite of the presence of the amphibian chytrid fungus.

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 14, 2016

The USGS Utah Water Science Center and the USGS Salton Sea Science Office work closely with Federal, State, local, nongovernmental, and tribal partners, providing valuable scientific information on the physical, chemical, and biological aspects of the Great Salt Lake and the Salton Sea.

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 14, 2016

Landscape change is constant—understanding the drivers of change, and shifts in the uses and perceived intrinsic value of certain landscapes, has a profound influence on how communities and ecosystems respond and adapt throughout the change process.

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 14, 2016

Water in the southwestern United States is a limited and precious resource, vital for municipal supply, generating hydroelectric power, supporting agriculture and energy development, providing for recreational opportunities, and sustaining ecosystems and their interdependent wildlife.

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 14, 2016

Energy and mineral resources are the foundation of many economies across the Southwest Region and provide the basic materials necessary for the Nation's quality of life and economic vitality.

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 14, 2016

Wildland fire is a natural phenomenon that helps maintain and propagate healthy forest and rangeland ecosystems. However, it is a growing hazard as communities expand into the wildland urban-interface.

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 3, 2016

The laboratory capabilities include imaging, ex-ray analysis, x-ray mapping, image processing, and optical microscopy.

Yellowstone Volcano Observatory logo
March 2, 2016

Monitors and studies the active geologic processes and hazards of the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field and its caldera. Yellowstone National Park contains the largest and most diverse collection of natural thermal features in the world. YVO also monitors volcanic activity in Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 26, 2016

Many species of sea turtle are endangered. Conservation of these species is complicated by their complex life history, the broad spatial distribution of different life stages, and their migratory nature. Monitoring programs track general status of populations and evaluate the effect of management actions on species conservation.

Water Use Site Retrieval Page Icon
September 1, 1977

In 1977, the Congress of the United States recognized the need for uniform, current, and reliable information on water use and directed the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to establish a National Water-Use Information Program (NWUIP) to complement the Survey's data on the availability and quality of the Nations water resources. Since 1985 site-specific water-use data for several categories have been collected and compiled annually by the Arkansas Natural Resources Commission (ANRC) in cooperation with the USGS. Data for the irrigation and livestock ( animal specialties ) categories are reported through the Conservation District Offices in each county. Site-specific water-use data for public supply, commercial, industrial, mining, power generation, irrigation and livestock ( stock and animal specialties ) are stored in the USGS Arkansas Water Science Center's Water-Use Data Base System (WUDBS). Water-use data for domestic (self-supplied) and livestock (stock) are not required to report to ANRC. In some categories it is necessary to supplement these data from other sources. These sources include public agencies, industries, public utilities, other organizations, and individuals.