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Date published: February 25, 2021

Post-wildfire Landslides Becoming More Frequent in Southern California

Southern California can now expect to see post-wildfire landslides occurring almost every year, with major events expected roughly every ten years, a new study led by U.S. Geological Survey researchers finds.

Date published: February 23, 2021

New USGS Strategy Harnesses State-of-the-Art Science to Tackle Wildfires Before, During and After the Flames

To help address growing wildfire-related challenges in America, the U.S. Geological Survey is rolling out a new Wildland Fire Science Strategy that lays out the critical needs for wildfire research over the next five years. Released today, this strategy can be used to better understand the balance between fire’s benefits and its detrimental impacts.

Date published: February 17, 2021

Mars 2020 Mission: The Perseverance Rover Landing

The excitement of the Perseverance rover landing on Mars can be witnessed on NASA TV starting at 11:15 PST on February 18, 2021.

Date published: February 16, 2021

ShakeAlert Earthquake Early Warning Delivery for the Pacific Northwest

Starting March 11, 2021, ShakeAlert®-powered earthquake early warning alerts will be available for delivery directly to wireless devices in Oregon. In May 2021, Washington state will follow suit and complete the ShakeAlert public alerting rollout across the entire West Coast. California enabled ShakeAlert-powered alerts in October 2019. 

Date published: February 16, 2021

USGS Updates Mineral Database with Niobium Deposits in the United States 

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has updated its USMIN Mineral Deposit Database (USMIN) for the mineral commodity niobium, one of 35 mineral commodities declared critical by the U.S. Department of the Interior. Sites in this dataset occur in Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Nebraska and Texas.

Date published: February 8, 2021

USGS Study on Threatened Coral Can Guide Reef Restoration

Nursery-grown elkhorn coral transplanted into Dry Tortugas National Park survived and thrived, growing twice as fast as corals planted in other locations in the Florida Keys, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey study published in Endangered Species Research.

Date published: February 5, 2021

USGS Releases Estimate of Natural Gas in Alaska's Western North Slope

USGS provides its first estimate of conventional natural gas resources in rock formations west of the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska. The rock formations in this region are believed to contain no recoverable oil deposits, so no assessment was made of those resources in this study. 

Date published: February 4, 2021

Low-Flying Airplane Mapping Parts of Northeastern California

Residents should not be alarmed if they see a low-flying airplane over parts of northeastern California starting February 6, 2021.

Date published: February 4, 2021

The Disaster that Helped the Nation Prepare for Future Earthquakes: Remembering San Fernando

The San Fernando earthquake struck Southern California 50 years ago, killing 64 people and costing over $500 million in damages. The quake prompted federal, state and local action to reduce earthquake risks and bolster public safety.

Date published: February 2, 2021

US Mines Produced an Estimated $82.3 Billion in Minerals During 2020

U.S. mines produced approximately $82.3 billion in minerals in 2020— about $1.5 billion lower than the 2019 revised total of $83.7 billion—the U.S. Geological Survey announced February 2.  

Date published: February 1, 2021

New Scientist-in-Charge at the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

HILO, Hawaii — The U.S. Geological Survey has selected Dr. Ken Hon as the new Scientist-in-Charge at the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in Hilo, Hawaii. HVO was founded in 1912 by Dr. Thomas A. Jaggar, and Hon will serve as HVO’s 21rst director.

Date published: January 29, 2021

Who’s Sharing? Inconsistent Eyewitness Accounts Can Affect How We Understand Earthquakes

Scientists rely on seismometers and eyewitness accounts to identify an earthquake’s location, time and magnitude. A new study explores how the latter can be limited by socioeconomic factors, which can create biases in datasets that scientists use to characterize seismic hazards and coordinate emergency response.