Environmental Health

Photomicroscopy and Flow Cytometry Laboratory

 

About the Laboratory

Microbiologists at the Photomicroscopy and Flow Cytometry Laboratory develop and apply biomarkers to evaluate the potential impacts of environmental contaminants at the cellular and molecular levels. Because molecular and biochemical responses of cells are preceded by chemical changes in nuclei, cytoplasm, membranes, and extracellular fluids, these responses can be diagnostic of contaminant exposures.

 

Microscopic video imaging is used for computerized analysis of sperm motility parameters

Photomicroscopy and Flow Cytometry Laboratory — Lafayette, Louisiana. Microscopic video imaging is used for computerized analysis of sperm motility parameters

(Public domain.)

Key Analytical Capabilities

  • Cell viability and motility
  • Mitochondrial membrane potential
  • Apoptosis (programmed cell death)
  • Liver enzyme vitality
  • Ploidy
  • DNA fragmentation
  • Cell cycle/proliferation
  • Genome size
  • Cell counts
  • Blood cell type identification
  • Epigenetics
  • Immunopheno typing

 

Conceptual diagram of the flow cytometry technique. Flow cytometry is a technique for rapidly analyzing large numbers of cells

Conceptual diagram of the flow cytometry technique. Flow cytometry is a technique for rapidly analyzing large numbers of animal cells using light-scattering, fluorescence, and absorbance measurements.

(Credit: J. Paul Robinson, PhD, SVM Professor of Cytomics, Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Purdue University)

Eosin-nigrosin staining of spermatozoa from common carp  testes collected from the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Nevada

Eosin-nigrosin staining of spermatozoa from common carp (Cyprinus carpio) testes collected from the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Nevada

(Credit: Jill Jenkins, USGS. Public domain.)

Key Instrumentation

  • Flow Cytometer
  • Computer Assisted Sperm Motion Analysis (CASA) System
  • Microscopes and microscopic image analysis software
Flow cytometry results from testicular tissue collected from two yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from Chesapeake Bay tributaries

Flow cytometry results from testicular tissue collected from two yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from Chesapeake Bay tributaries Mattawoman Creek (A, B) and South River (C, D).

(Credit: Jill Jenkins, USGS. Public domain.)

 

Contacts

Jill Jenkins, Ph.D.

Research Microbiologist
Wetland and Aquatic Research Center
Phone: 337-266-8607

Michael Focazio, PhD

Environmental Health Program Coordinator
Ecosystems
Phone: 703-648-6808

Geoffrey Plumlee, Ph.D.

Chief Scientist
Office of the Director
Phone: 703-648-6403