Mission Areas

Climate and Land Use Change

Mission Areas L2 Landing Page Tabs

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USGS Scientist Mark Roth listening to frog calls.
2002 (approx.)
USGS Scientist Mark Roth listening to frog calls. Coolecting frog calls allows scientists to determine distribution of species.
Repeat oblique photographs of Gulkana glaciers in Alaska.
1967 (approx.)
Repeat oblique photographs of Gulkana glaciers in Alaska. 1967, Unknown USGS photographer. 2016, L. Sass, USGS.
Repeat oblique photographs of Wolverine glacier in Alaska.
1966 (approx.)
Repeat oblique photographs of Wolverine glacier in Alaska. 1966 image by unknown USGS photographer; 2015 image by L. Sass, USGS.
Filter Total Items: 160
collage of scientists conducting science related to each mission are
March 15, 2016

The U.S. Geological Survey and the European Space Agency (ESA) have established an innovative partnership to enable USGS storage and redistribution of Earth observation data acquired by Copernicus program satellites.

Image: Wildfire and Alaskan Permafrost
March 14, 2016

USGS scientists, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Minnesota and University of Alaska Fairbanks, have mapped belowground permafrost in areas of Alaska that have been affected by wildfire, years-to-decades after the fires occurred.  

collage of scientists conducting science related to each mission are
March 14, 2016

Much of the coast from Maine to Virginia is more likely to change than to simply drown in response to rising seas during the next 70 years or so, according to a new study led by the U.S. Geological Survey.

Image: Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed
March 7, 2016

Alder, aspen, birch, elm, maple and oak are some of the most popular trees in North America. But it might come as a surprise that aspen, with their iconic white bark and beautiful autumn colors, have the largest range of any tree on the continent – one that extends from Alaska to Mexico and Vancouver to Maine, including almost every elevation in between.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 9, 2016

WASHINGTON—The President’s fiscal year (FY) 2017 budget request for the U.S. Geological Survey reflects the USGS's vital role in addressing some of the most pressing challenges of the 21st Century by advancing scientific discovery and innovation.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 9, 2016

Reston, VA – Inland capture fisheries are much more crucial to global food security than realized, according to the first global review of the value of inland fish and fisheries.

Publication Cover for Public Access to USGS Research
February 8, 2016

The U.S. Geological Survey is implementing new measures that will improve public access to USGS-funded science as detailed in its new public access plan.

USGS science for a changing world logo
December 14, 2015

Scientists from the National Park Service and the U.S. Geological Survey have reconstructed the recent migration history of ponderosa pine trees in the central Rocky Mountains.

Current probability of near-surface permafrost in Alaska
November 30, 2015

Using statistically modeled maps drawn from satellite data and other sources, U.S. Geological Survey scientists have projected that the near-surface permafrost that presently underlies 38 percent of boreal and arctic Alaska would be reduced by 16 to 24 percent by the end of the 21st century under widely accepted climate scenarios.

A brook trout swimming in stream.
November 23, 2015

A coalition of research institutions and fish and wildlife agencies this week unveiled a new online tool for use by local decision-makers, conservation managers, land trusts, regional planners, landowners and community leaders in Massachusetts who are interested in taking action in response to climate change.

USGS science for a changing world logo
November 9, 2015

The U.S. Geological Survey announced today that it has made part of a huge national repository of geographically referenced USGS field photographs publicly available. USGS geographers developed a simple, easy-to-use mapping portal called the Land Cover Trends Field Photo Map.

USGS science for a changing world logo
November 9, 2015

According to new U.S. Geological Survey research springs and marshes in the desert outside Las Vegas expanded and contracted dramatically in response to past episodes of abrupt climate change, even disappearing altogether for centuries at a time when conditions became too warm.