Mission Areas

Climate and Land Use Change

Mission Areas L2 Landing Page Tabs

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Mother and young caribou on Yukon-Alaska border
August 9, 2015
A mother caribou and her offspring, east of Chicken, Alaska (on the Yukon-Alaska border).
2015 (approx.)
Residents and visitors both revel in Kauai’s lush landscape, and beneath its seascape. However, it’s underwater where things don’t look so healthy. Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey put together a detailed picture of the physical environment of the coral reefs at Makua Beach. Understanding just what these reefs are exposed to and for how long, may help explain why some corals here have...
2015 (approx.)
The Hawaiian Islands’ beautiful ocean and beaches attract more than 8.5 million tourists each year. The USGS aims to help Hawaii preserve its underwater natural resources by tracing how oceanography may influence coral disease outbreaks. Looking into contaminants in the freshwater, or how quickly a bay may or may not flush, will help enrich future and past studies about the disease itself.
Canyonlands National Park as seen by Landsat 8
March 29, 2015
Canyonlands National Park was one of four national parks esatblished (1964) under the leadership of Interior Secretary Stewart Udall. Image, Landsat 8, 3/29/2015.
Eltanin Bay, West Antarctica_Landsat 8 OLI
March 2, 2015
Landsat 8 OLI image of retreating glacial ice near Eltanin Bay, West Antarctica
June 10, 2013
This presentation, "A mammal's take on the Rapture Hypothesis, Jacob's Ladder, and other notions of doom, gloom, and predictable uniform change in high elevation ecosystems of the Sierra Nevada", was conducted by Robert Klinger as a part of the Climate Change Science and Management Webinar Series.
A large boulder-shaped Massive Starlet coral on the sea floor in Dry Tortugas National Park
2012 (approx.)
Scientists used a core from this Massive Starlet ( Siderastrea siderea ) coral colony in Dry Tortugas National Park to reconstruct ocean temperatures going back to 1837. Photo: USGS
A SCUBA diver beside a Massive starlet coral on the sea floor at Dry Tortugas National Park
2012 (approx.)
A USGS diver beside a Massive Starlet ( Siderastrea siderea ) coral colony in Dry Tortugas National Park. Scientists used a core from this coral to reconstruct ocean temperatures going back to 1837. Photo: USGS, May 2012
Filter Total Items: 166
Stream rushing through the woods
April 4, 2016

A new study offers hope for cold-water species in the face of climate change. The study, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, addresses a longstanding paradox between predictions of widespread extinctions of cold-water species and a general lack of evidence for those extinctions despite decades of recent climate change.

Image: View of Mount Rainier
April 4, 2016

Each summer the Northwest Climate Science Center hosts a weeklong Climate Boot Camp. The Boot Camp invites early career climate professionals from the Northwest and across the country get together to expand their knowledge and skills.

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 22, 2016

RESTON, Va. — A new public-private research collaboration supported by the U.S. Geological Survey will tackle how to best cope with the increasing droughts of the future.

California's hotter drought has already killed millions of trees, particularly in low-elevation forests.
March 22, 2016

California's hotter droughts are a preview of a warmer future world.

collage of scientists conducting science related to each mission are
March 15, 2016

The U.S. Geological Survey and the European Space Agency (ESA) have established an innovative partnership to enable USGS storage and redistribution of Earth observation data acquired by Copernicus program satellites.

Image: Wildfire and Alaskan Permafrost
March 14, 2016

USGS scientists, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Minnesota and University of Alaska Fairbanks, have mapped belowground permafrost in areas of Alaska that have been affected by wildfire, years-to-decades after the fires occurred.  

collage of scientists conducting science related to each mission are
March 14, 2016

Much of the coast from Maine to Virginia is more likely to change than to simply drown in response to rising seas during the next 70 years or so, according to a new study led by the U.S. Geological Survey.

Image: Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed
March 7, 2016

Alder, aspen, birch, elm, maple and oak are some of the most popular trees in North America. But it might come as a surprise that aspen, with their iconic white bark and beautiful autumn colors, have the largest range of any tree on the continent – one that extends from Alaska to Mexico and Vancouver to Maine, including almost every elevation in between.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 9, 2016

WASHINGTON—The President’s fiscal year (FY) 2017 budget request for the U.S. Geological Survey reflects the USGS's vital role in addressing some of the most pressing challenges of the 21st Century by advancing scientific discovery and innovation.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 9, 2016

Reston, VA – Inland capture fisheries are much more crucial to global food security than realized, according to the first global review of the value of inland fish and fisheries.