Mission Areas

Climate and Land Use Change

Mission Areas L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 172
Satellite image of lithium mining in Salar de Atacama, Chile
December 30, 2015
The Salar de Atacama in Chile is a large, dry salt flat surrounded by mountain ranges and is one of the driest places on Earth. Parts of the Atacama Desert have gone without rain for as long as people have been keeping track, but water rich in dissolved salts lies beneath this flat surface. The Salar is particularly rich in lithium salts.
U.S. Life-Saving Station in Portsmouth Historic Village, Cape Lookout National Seashore
2015 (approx.)
A U.S. Life-Saving Station in Portsmouth Historic Village, Cape Lookout National Seashore. The station was build in 1894 to rescue ship-wrecked mariners. This is one of many cultural resources at Cape Lookout National Seashore that may be threatened by climate change. Erin Seekamp, a researcher working with the DOI Southeast Climate Science Center (managed by USGS), is developing a method to...
The 1859 Cape Lookout Lighthouse and keeper's quarters
2015 (approx.)
The 1859 Cape Lookout Lighthouse and keeper's quarters, Cape Lookout National Seashore. This is one of many cultural resources at Cape Lookout National Seashore that may be threatened by climate change. Erin Seekamp, a researcher working with the DOI Southeast Climate Science Center (managed by USGS), is developing a method to identify which of the Park's cultural resources are most in need of...
The 1907 Keeper's Quarters, Cape Lookout National Seashore
2015 (approx.)
The 1907 Keeper's Quarter's, Cape Lookout National Seashore. This house was originally located by the lighthouse, but was moved in 1958 when it was no longer needed and was used as a private residence. This is one of many cultural resources at Cape Lookout National Seashore that may be threatened by climate change. Erin Seekamp, a researcher working with the DOI Southeast Climate Science Center (...
2015 (approx.)
Barter Island sits at the top of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska, and with the Arctic facing quickly rising temperatures, USGS wants to investigate what’s causing the North Slope bluffs to erode so quickly. This permafrost environment is complex, so USGS studies many facets-- from radon in the groundwater to sand grains along the coast-- of this frozen landscape.
Mother and young caribou on Yukon-Alaska border
August 9, 2015
A mother caribou and her offspring, east of Chicken, Alaska (on the Yukon-Alaska border).
2015 (approx.)
The Hawaiian Islands’ beautiful ocean and beaches attract more than 8.5 million tourists each year. The USGS aims to help Hawaii preserve its underwater natural resources by tracing how oceanography may influence coral disease outbreaks. Looking into contaminants in the freshwater, or how quickly a bay may or may not flush, will help enrich future and past studies about the disease itself.
Canyonlands National Park as seen by Landsat 8
March 29, 2015
Canyonlands National Park was one of four national parks esatblished (1964) under the leadership of Interior Secretary Stewart Udall. Image, Landsat 8, 3/29/2015.
Filter Total Items: 178
USGS
February 24, 2015

Kristin Timm, a designer with the Interior Department's Alaska Climate Science Center and the University of Alaska Fairbanks Scenarios Network for Alaska and Arctic Planning, is among 10 designers who were recently recognized internationally for excellence in science communication.

collage of scientists conducting science related to each mission are
February 20, 2015

After surveying and analyzing centuries of evidence in the floodplain of the lower Roanoke River, USGS researchers, along with colleagues from the universities of Wisconsin and North Carolina, have developed a highly accurate estimate of sediment deposition amounts along the course of the river over three timescales — annual, decadal, and centennial.

Three panel view of Alaska from NLCD
February 18, 2015

The latest edition of the National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD 2011) for Alaska is now publicly available.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 10, 2015

A new U.S. Geological Survey study shows how plants’ vulnerability to drought varies across the landscape; factors such as plant structure and soil type where the plant is growing can either make them more vulnerable or protect them from declines.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 2, 2015

The President’s fiscal year 2016 budget request for the U.S. Geological Survey is $1.2 billion, an increase of nearly $150 million above the FY 2015 enacted level.

Map showing coverage of improved topographic data
January 26, 2015

Improved global topographic (elevation) data are now publicly available for most of Asia (India, China, southern Siberia, Japan, Indonesia), Oceania (Australia, New Zealand), and western Pacific Islands. See diagram below for geographic coverage.

USGS science for a changing world logo
January 20, 2015

ANCHORAGE, Alaska Melting glaciers are not just impacting sea level, they are also affecting the flow of organic carbon to the world’s oceans, according to new research that provides the first ever global-scale estimates for the storage and release of organic carbon from glaciers.

collage of scientists conducting science related to each mission are
January 6, 2015

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — In a new polar bear study published today, scientists from around the Arctic have shown that recent generations of polar bears are moving towards areas with more persistent year-round sea ice.

collage of scientists conducting science related to each mission are
December 18, 2014

As part of President Obama's Climate Action Plan, research funding will provide land and wildlife managers with tools to adapt to climate change

Map showing drought coverage of California
December 8, 2014

A newly released interactive California Drought visualization website aims to provide the public with atlas-like, state-wide coverage of the drought and a timeline of its impacts on water resources.

Image: Western Glacier Stonefly
December 4, 2014

The persistence of an already rare aquatic insect, the western glacier stonefly, is being imperiled by the loss of glaciers and increased stream temperatures due to climate warming in mountain ecosystems, according to a new study released in Freshwater Science.

USGS
November 24, 2014

Climate change could lengthen the growing season, make soil drier and decrease winter snowpack in the Lake Michigan Basin by the turn of the century, among other hydrological effects.