Mission Areas

Climate and Land Use Change

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Climate and Land Use science is essential to improve understanding of past and present change; develop relevant forecasts; and identify those lands, resources, and communities most vulnerable to Earth system change processes.

Our Science Strategy
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A Decision Support Tool for Repatriation of Aquatic Fauna: A Case Study Involving the Striped Newt (Notophthalmus perstriatus) a
April 17, 2015

The Striped Newt is a small salamander found in xeric habitats (e.g., scrub, sandhill, dry flatwoods) of the lower coastal plain and northern peninsular Florida. Though once considered "common," they are currently a candidate species for federal listing. ...

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USGS scientist Layne Adams places a radiocollar on a sedated large bull caribou in Denali National Park, Alaska
2015 (approx.)
USGS scientist Layne Adams places a radiocollar on a sedated large bull caribou in Denali National Park, Alaska.
2015 (approx.)
Jay Hootch, former employee of Yupitt of Andreafski, drills to take winter chemistry samples to be used in a permafrost loss study in the Yukon River Basin.
Packrats and Their Midden
2015 (approx.)
Packrats near their midden in the City of Rocks National Reserve. USGS Image (J. Betancourt).
USGS biologist Gretchen Roffler weighs a newborn caribou calf in Denali National Park, Alaska
2015 (approx.)
USGS biologist Gretchen Roffler weighs a newborn caribou calf in Denali National Park, Alaska.
Scientist collects samples from a temporary wooden platform in a New Jersey salt marsh
2015 (approx.)
Caption: USGS scientist Zafer Defne measures water and sediment movement at Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey. Defne is co-author with USGS' Neil Ganju of a 2017 study on how to estimate coastal salt marshes' potential longevity, based on their sediment budgets and the ratio of open water to vegetation. Photo: Sandra Brosnahan, USGS
USGS researcher gets ready to take water samples in the Yukon River Basin
2015 (approx.)
Charles Couvillion (USGS Alaska Science Center) at Pilot Station, AK, getting ready to take water samples and discharge measurements for a permafrost study in the Yukon River Basin.
2015 (approx.)
Heading out to take water chemistry samples for a study on permafrost in the Yukon River Basin. The study examined the chemical and hydrological changes occurring in the basin due to permafrost loss.
USGS staff dig snowpits to evaluate the snow structure after a wet snow avalanche cycle.
2015 (approx.)
USGS staff dig snowpits to evaluate the snow structure after a wet snow avalanche cycle. This helps identify weak layers responsible for wet slab avalanches along the Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park.
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A landscape view of the drylands of southern Utah
August 9, 2016

U.S. Geological Survey scientists will present their research at the Ecological Society of America meeting from Aug. 7-12, 2016, in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The theme is "Novel Ecosystems in the Anthropocene." 

Claudia Regan
August 3, 2016

New Center Director to sustain NOROCK’s tradition of productivity and partnership in generating ground-breaking science relevant to resource managers in the Northern Rocky Mountains and beyond.

Black-throated gray warbler
July 22, 2016

Researchers are working to understand how to lessen the impacts of climate change on birds and other forest inhabitants.

Landsat 8
July 18, 2016

In western North America, mountain pine beetles infest and ravage thousands of acres of forest lands. Landsat satellites bear witness to the onslaught in a way that neither humans nor most other satellites can.

Smallmouth Bass
June 29, 2016

Climate change is already affecting inland fish across North America -- including some fish that are popular with anglers. Scientists are seeing a variety of changes in how inland fish reproduce, grow and where they can live.