Mission Areas

Natural Hazards

Mission Areas L2 Landing Page Tabs

Costs and consequences of natural hazards can be enormous; each year more people and infrastructure are at risk. We develop and apply hazards science to help protect U.S. safety, security, and economic well being. These scientific observations, analyses, and research are crucial for the Nation to become more resilient to natural hazards.

Read Our Science Strategy
Filter Total Items: 113
Date published: March 2, 2016

Emergency Operations Portal

Explore critical pre- and post-disaster images and datasets online for immediate viewing and downloading. These images are used in disaster preparations, rescue and relief operations, damage assessments, and reconstruction efforts. We supply satellite and aerial images for analysis of disaster areas before, during, and after a disaster.

Date published: March 2, 2016

Geomagnetism Research

Research projects within the USGS Geomagnetism Program are targeted for societal relevance, especially for space-weather hazard science.

Date published: March 2, 2016

Interior Geospatial Emergency Management System (IGEMS)

The IGEMS provides the public with both an overview and more specific information on current natural hazard events. The Department of the Interior’s Office of Emergency Management provides it as an internet-accessible service.

Date published: March 2, 2016

Geomagnetism Monitoring

The USGS Geomagnetism Program currently operates 14 magnetic observatories. Magnetometer data are collected at these facilities, and the data are then transmitted to Program headquarters in Golden, Colorado.

Date published: March 2, 2016

Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO)

The AVO is a partnership among the USGS, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys. To mitigate volcanic hazards, AVO monitors and studies Alaska's hazardous volcanoes to forecast and record eruptive activity. AVO also monitors volcanic activity in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

Date published: March 2, 2016

Landslides Research

Our Program researches activities to make accurate landslide hazard maps and forecasts of landslide occurrences.

Date published: March 2, 2016

USGS California Volcano Observatory (CalVO)

CalVO operates real-time volcano monitoring networks, disseminates forecasts and notifications of significant activity, assesses volcano hazards, researches volcano processes, and works with communities to prepare for volcanic eruptions in California and Nevada. The Observatory is located at USGS offices in Menlo Park, California.

Date published: March 2, 2016

Landslide Monitoring

Landslide sites and data for learning more about the physical processes that trigger landslides or control their movement.

Date published: March 2, 2016

Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO)

The CVO staff conduct research on many aspects of active volcanism, respond to dangerous volcanic activity in many parts of the world, and maintain a close watch over volcanoes in Washington, Oregon and Idaho. The USGS established CVO in Vancouver, Washington, after the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens.

Date published: March 2, 2016

"The First Sue Nami"

Tsunami awareness public service announcements come from collaboration among the USGS SAFRR team, outside partners, and Pasadena's Art Center College of Design.

Date published: March 2, 2016

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO)

HVO operates monitoring networks, assesses hazards, and issues notifications of volcanic activity and earthquakes in the State of Hawai‘i. HVO scientists conduct fundamental research on volcanic processes and work to educate the communities at risk. HVO is located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park on the Island of Hawaii.

Date published: March 1, 2016
Status: Completed

SAFRR CORE

CORE - Cadre of Relevant Experts

Filter Total Items: 1,689
Low elevation dunes on East Ship Island
October 10, 2017

Pre-and Post Storm Photo for Hurricane Nate - East Ship Island

Low elevation dunes on East Ship Island were inundated by waves and surge from Hurricane Nate. Sand was transported across the entire island, covering vegetation and filling in ponds. The predicted probability of inundation in this location was 98%. 

low-elevation east end of Horn Island
October 10, 2017

Pre-and Post Storm Photo for Hurricane Nate - Horn Island

The low-elevation east end of Horn Island was inundated by waves and storm surge during Hurricane Nate. The predicted probability of inundation for this location was 98%.

Elevated water levels during Hurricane Nate overtopped the low dunes on Petit Bois Island
October 10, 2017

Pre-and Post Storm Photo for Hurricane Nate - Petit Bois Island

Elevated water levels during Hurricane Nate overtopped the low dunes on Petit Bois Island. The predicted probability of overwash for this location was 99%.

spit on the far western end of west Dauphin Island was breached during Hurricane Nate
October 10, 2017

Pre-and Post Storm Photo for Hurricane Nate - Dauphin Island

The low elevation spit on the far western end of west Dauphin Island was breached during Hurricane Nate. The predicted probability of inundation was 54%, likely due to the inclusion of the higher elevation dunes to the east of the spit in the 1-km alongshore prediction area. 

water levels during Hurricane Nate overtopped and eroded the rock barrier
October 10, 2017

Pre-and Post Storm Photo for Hurricane Nate - Dauphin Island

Elevated water levels during Hurricane Nate overtopped and eroded the rock barrier that was constructed to close the breach that formed in Dauphin Island during Hurricane Katrina. The predicted probability of inundation in this location was 96%. 

surge and waves from Hurricane Nate overtopped and cut through the line of dunes
October 10, 2017

Pre-and Post Storm Photo for Hurricane Nate - Dauphin Island

The low-elevation west end of Dauphin Island is especially vulnerable to storms and has been impacted by multiple storm events over the last decade. Storm surge and waves from Hurricane Nate overtopped and cut through the line of dunes in front of the road, depositing sand across the road in overwash fans. The predicted probability of overwash in this location was 95%. 

Pre-and Post Storm Photo for Hurricane Nate - Dauphin Island
October 10, 2017

Pre-and Post Storm Photo for Hurricane Nate - Fort Morgan, Alabama

Elevated water levels and high waves during Hurricane Nate overtopped low spots in the line of dunes near Fort Morgan, Alabama. The fan-like sand deposits behind the dunes indicate that sand was transported landward, while the sandbar offshore indicates that sand was also transported seaward during the storm. The predicted probability of overwash for this location was 84%.

Potential coastal change impacts for Hurricane Nate - Oct. 7, 2017
October 7, 2017

Potential coastal change impacts for Hurricane Nate - Oct. 7, 2017

Screen shot of the Coastal Change Hazards Portal showing potential coastal change impacts during a direct landfall of Hurricane Nate based on NHC Advisory 12, 0800 AM EDT SAT OCT 07 2017.

Erosion forecast map for Northern Gulf sandy shorelines
October 6, 2017

Tropical Storm Nate's Forecasted Effect on Gulf Beaches

Tropical Storm Nate's predicted effect on Northern Gulf sandy shorelines, based on landfall as a Category 1 hurricane,  is shown at three intensities. Outer band:  Dune erosion. Middle band: Dune overwash. Inner band: Dune inundation, with potential flooding behind the dune. Credit: USGS Coastal Change Hazard Portal.

Marco Island before and after Hurricane Irma
September 30, 2017

Hurricane Irma Pre- and Post-Storm Photo Comparisons - Marco Island

Location 1: Even though the predicted probability of overwash was 99%, elevated water levels during Hurricane Irma did not overtop the seawall on the southern end of Marco Island, but eroded much of the beach in front. Some overwash can be seen to the north of the seawall.

elevated water levels during Hurricane Irma overtopped the low-elevation dunes on Keewaydin Island
September 30, 2017

Hurricane Irma Pre- and Post-Storm Photo Comparisons - Keewaydin

Location 2: Elevated water levels during Hurricane Irma overtopped the low-elevation dunes on Keewaydin Island near Naples, depositing sand on top of and behind the dunes in overwash fans. The predicted probability of overwash in this location was 100%.

small breach formed at a low spot on Keewaydin Island
September 30, 2017

Hurricane Irma Pre- and Post-Storm Photo Comparisons - Keewaydin Is.

Location 3: A small breach formed at a low spot on Keewaydin Island. The predicted probability of inundation in this location was 100%. 

Filter Total Items: 317
Date published: August 25, 2017

USGS Prepares for Hurricane Harvey

To learn more about USGS’ role providing science to decision makers before, during and after Hurricane Harvey, visit the USGS Hurricane Harvey page.

Date published: August 25, 2017

Many Texas Beaches Likely to Erode, Be Overwashed, or Inundated by Hurricane Harvey

To learn more about USGS’ role providing science to decision makers before, during and after Hurricane Harvey, visit the USGS Hurricane Harvey page.

UPDATE: This story has been revised to reflect new NOAA-National Hurricane Center storm surge projections which were released August 25 at 7 a.m.

Date published: August 24, 2017

Many Texas Beaches Likely to Erode, Be Overwashed, or Inundated by Hurricane Harvey

To learn more about USGS’ role providing science to decision makers before, during and after Hurricane Harvey, visit the USGS Hurricane Harvey page.

UPDATE: This story has been revised to reflect new NOAA-National Hurricane Center storm surge projections which were released August 25 at 7 a.m.

Date published: August 24, 2017

USGS Installs Storm-tide Sensors along Texas Coast prior to Harvey’s Arrival

To learn more about USGS’ role providing science to decision makers before, during and after Hurricane Harvey, visit the USGS Hurricane Harvey page.

Storm-tide sensors are being installed at key locations along the Texas Gulf Coast by the U.S. Geological Survey in advance of Hurricane Harvey.

Date published: August 14, 2017

USGS Awards $4.9 Million to Advance the ShakeAlert Earthquake Early Warning System on West Coast

The U.S. Geological Survey awarded approximately $4.9 million this week to six universities and a university-governed non-profit, to support transitioning the west coast “ShakeAlert” earthquake early warning system into a production system.

Date published: August 11, 2017

MEDIA ADVISORY: Upcoming Low-Level Flights in Oklahoma to Image Unmapped Faults and Underground Geology

Editor:  In the public interest and in accordance with Federal Aviation Administration regulations, the USGS is announcing this low-level airborne project.  Your assistance in informing the local communities is appreciated.

Date published: August 8, 2017

International Volcano Science Meeting in Portland

Join volcano scientists from around the world during scientific meeting and associated public event in Portland.

Date published: August 8, 2017

MEDIA ADVISORY: Media Webinar – Gathering and Sharing Information about Recent Earthquakes

After the next significant earthquake, many sources will be disseminating information from a variety of accounts, tools and services.

Date published: August 7, 2017

Hazard a Guess? The riskiest science quiz you will ever take!

True or False:  Lightning that takes place during a volcanic eruption is the same as lightning that occurs during a thunderstorm?

Date published: July 31, 2017

Harvesting Earthquake Fault Slip f­rom Laser Images of Napa's Vineyards

A new U.S. Geological Survey-led study suggests that earthquake-related deformation just below the Earth's surface can be quite different from how it is expressed at the surface.

Date published: July 27, 2017

Reporters: Join as GeoGirls Dig Geology at Mount St. Helens

MEDIA ADVISORY

Twenty-five middle-school girls from 11 cities in Washington and Oregon are participating in the third annual “GeoGirls” outdoor volcano science program at Mount St. Helens, jointly organized by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Mount St. Helens Institute.