Regions

Alaska Region

Regions L2 Landing Page Tabs

Browse a selection of videos, audio clips, images, and more from a wide range of science topics covered by USGS!

"Science for a Changing World" - watch the short film here!

Documentary on walruses here!

Watch the first-ever footage of a polar bear on Arctic sea ice!

Join USGS geologists as they collect lava samples from Kilauea Volcano.

Watch researchers in the Arctic!

Filter Total Items: 112
video thumbnail: Drew Point, AK Time-Lapse Photography of Coastal Erosion
June 26, 2008

Drew Point, AK Time-Lapse Photography of Coastal Erosion

4-week time-lapse photography of the Arctic coast at Drew Point, AK shows mass wasting of the coastal sediments in July, 2008

Attribution: Water Resources, Alaska
video thumbnail: Drew Point, AK Time-Lapse Photography of Coastal Erosion
June 5, 2008

Drew Point, AK Time-Lapse Photography of Coastal Erosion

4-week time-lapse photography of the Arctic coast at Drew Point, AK shows intense coastal erosion in early July, 2008

Attribution: Water Resources, Alaska
Image shows a drill rig on a snowy landscape
December 31, 2007

Gas Hydrate Drill Rig at the Mt. Elbert Test Site in Alaska

A drill rig at the Mount Elbert test site in Alaska's North Slope, just west of Prudhoe Bay. USGS joined BP Exploration (Alaska) and the U.S. Department of Energy to drill a test well to study natural gas production from gas hydrate deposits. Read more about the Mt. Elbert project 

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May 31, 2006

Mount St. Helens: Instrumentation and Dome Growth, April-May 2006

The first priority of any eruption is to assess current status and what might happen next. To accomplish this, Mount St. Helens became one of most heavily monitored volcanoes. At the start of the 2004–08 eruption, 13 permanent seismic stations operated within about 12 miles of Mount St. Helens. By the end of the eruption, the seismic network consisted of 20 stations.

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May 31, 2006

Mount St. Helens: Instrumentation and Dome Growth, May-Sept 2006

Throughout the eruption, scientists installed monitoring stations to track volcanic activity, deployed temporary monitoring ""spiders"", monitored the temperature of lava spines and created time-lapse of dome growth. During the 3+ years of the eruption, lava piled up to form a new dome 460 m (1,500 ft) high. The 92 million cubic meters (121 million cubic yards, or 36,800

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A gas plume arising from Augustine Volcano during it's eruptive phase 2005-06.
January 24, 2006

A gas plume arising from Augustine Volcano during it's eruptive phase 2005-06.

A gas plume arising from Augustine Volcano during it's eruptive phase 2005-06. This photo was taken during  a FLIR/maintenance flight on January 24, 2006.

Attribution: Natural Hazards, Alaska
April 30, 2005

Mount St. Helens: Instrumentation and Dome Growth, April - July 2005.

Lava spines continue to emerge onto the crater floor of Mount St. Helens in 2005. By April 2005, spine 4 is broken and pushed away by spine 5.  The nearly vertical spine 5 has a smooth, gouge-covered surface, growing at an average rate of 4.3 meters per day. Scientists continue helicopter overflights to measure the temperature of the lava dome and assess hazards from dome

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February 28, 2005

Mount St. Helens: Instrumentation and Dome Growth, Feb - Mar 15, 2005

Growth and disintegration of lava spines continued at Mount St. Helens through the first 8 months of 2005. Rather than building a single dome-shaped structure, the new dome grew initially as a series of recumbent, smoothly surfaced spines that extruded to lengths of almost 500 m. The potential for unpredictable explosions induced decisions to minimize the exposure of field

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January 31, 2005

Mount St. Helens: Instrumentation and Dome Growth, January 2005

Within the crater of Mount St. Helens, the 2004–2008 lava dome grew by continuous extrusion of degassed lava spines. To track growth and anticipate what the volcano might do next, scientists installed monitoring equipment, including a camera and gas sensing instruments, and made helicopter overflights to collect the temperature (FLIR) of the growing dome.
 

December 31, 2004

Mount St. Helens eruption highlights: September 2004 - May 2005

Compilation video of significant events from the dome-building eruption at Mount St. Helens, from October 1, 2004 to March 15, 2005, including steam and ash eruptions, growth of lava spines, helicopter deployment of monitoring equipment, collection of lava samples, and FLIR thermal imaging of rock collapse on lava dome.

  1. Eruption of Mount St. Helens,  October 1
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Stay up-to-date with what is happening in the Alaska Region by checking out our different social media accounts. You can also contact Alaska Regional Office staff or Center Directors for more information.