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Alaska Region

Regions L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 113
November 30, 2004

Mount St. Helens: Instrumentation and Dome Growth, Nov-Dec 2004

By late October 2004, a whaleback-shaped extrusion of solid lava (called a spine) emerged from Mount St. Helens' crater floor. The 2004–2008 lava dome grew by continuous extrusion of degassed lava spines that had mostly solidified at less than 1 km (0.62 mi) beneath the surface. Scientists deployed monitoring equipment and made visual observations to assess the hazards

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October 31, 2004

Mount St. Helens: Instrumentation and Dome Growth, Oct-Nov, 2004

On October 11, 2004, spines of solid, but still hot, lava punctured the surface of the deformed glacier, initiating a new dome-building phase of activity in the crater of Mount St. Helens. By late October, a larger whaleback-shaped extrusion of solid lava (called a spine) emerged from the crater floor. During the 3+ years of the eruption a series of hot, solid, smooth-

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October 31, 2004

Mount St. Helens: Steam, Ash Emissions and Dome Growth, October 2004

After two weeks of increasing seismicity, Mount St. Helens began erupting on October 1, 2004. The first of several explosions shot a plume of volcanic ash and gases into the atmosphere. Four additional steam and ash explosions occurred through October 5, and three produced noticeable fallout of fine ash downwind. Following the brief series of small steam-and-ash explosions

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October 31, 2004

Mount St. Helens: Instrumentation and Dome Growth, Oct 2004-Sept 2005

Following unrest that began on September 23, 2004 and the steam and ash eruptions in early October, extrusion of solid magma typified the 2004-2008 eruption at Mount St. Helens. The magma is unusually gas poor and crystal rich.  Several meters of pulverized, variably sintered rock commonly coat the emergent lava spines, lending them a smooth appearance.  Other spines have

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Polar bear mother and two cubs on the Beaufort Sea ice.
January 16, 2001

Polar bear mother and two cubs on the Beaufort Sea ice

Polar bear mother and two cubs on the Beaufort Sea ice.

Looking upstream from mid channel of the John Wild River. Near Anaktuvuk, Alaska
April 18, 2000

John Wild River, near Anaktuvuk

Looking upstream from mid channel of the John Wild River. Near Anaktuvuk, Alaska.

Mount St. Helens soon after the May 18, 1980 eruption
September 10, 1980

Mount St. Helens soon after the May 18, 1980 eruption

Mount St. Helens soon after the May 18, 1980 eruption, as viewed from Johnston's Ridge.

Aerial photo of Mount St. Helens volcano, pre-1980 eruption
September 28, 1979

Aerial photo of Mount St. Helens volcano, pre-1980 eruption

Before the eruption of May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens' elevation was 2,950 m (9,677 ft). View from the west, Mount Adams in distance. S. Fork Toutle River is valley in center of photo.

Mount Adams elevation is 3,745 m (12, 286 ft). Mount St. Helens was the smallest of five major volcanic peaks in Washington State.