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USGS
April 7, 2000

Continued normal precipitation in March helped to replenish ground-water levels and reservoir supplies in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. region, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
March 7, 2000

Precipitation in February helped to replenish ground-water levels and reservoir supplies in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. region, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
February 8, 2000

Snowfall in January has had minimal impact on replenishing ground water levels and reservoir supplies in the Maryland-Delaware-D.C region, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Baltimore, Maryland.

USGS
December 6, 1999

Below-average streamflows in November caused a drop in reservoir levels and could signal a return to drought conditions if the trend continues over the winter months.

USGS
November 4, 1999

In October, the average daily flow rate in the Potomac River at Little Falls was 5.4 billion gallons per day (bgd) or about 290 percent of the normal October flow rate (1.9 bgd), according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). During October, flow varied from a high of about 15.3 bgd to a low of about 2.1 bgd.

USGS
October 14, 1999

Dick Thompson, Time magazine science correspondent, is the featured speaker in the Department of the Interior 150th Anniversary lecture series. Thompson’s presentation, "Taking a Volcano’s Pulse: The Evolution of the Science of Volcano Monitoring from Mt. St. Helens to Mt. Pinatubo," is sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey.

USGS
September 23, 1999

While much of eastern North Carolina remains under water, U.S. Geological Survey scientists and hydrologic technicians are boating over rooftops, submerged cars, and bridges and roads topped by deep water to collect data and determine the amount of environmental damage done by Hurricane Floyd’s heavy rains.

USGS
August 2, 1999

As crops wither, power plants try to manage overloads, and rivers and streams dwindle to mere trickles, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey are monitoring what could become this century’s worst drought. Such data is used by cities, counties, states and the federal government to plan for water shortages and to determine if similar problems can be avoided in the future.

USGS
July 30, 1999

Media briefing on current drought conditions in the Mid-Atlantic region including Virginia, Maryland, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey and New York.

USGS
July 7, 1999

No, not another meteor disaster movie, but something left a big impression in the Chesapeake Bay.

USGS
July 6, 1999

Has the Potomac River been looking a little dry lately? Hydrologists -- i.e. water specialists--with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) will measure the potentially serious effects of the intense heat and lack of rain using a variety of instruments that you probably won’t find in your garage. USGS will measure water levels in the Potomac River -- Washington’s sole source of tap water.

USGS
July 2, 1999

As the Mid-Atlantic region continued to experience prolonged dry weather, flow into the Chesapeake Bay and from its three main tributaries dropped to record low volumes for the month of June, according to U.S. Geological Survey hydrologists.