Due to a lapse in appropriations, the majority of USGS websites may not be up to date and may not reflect current conditions. Websites displaying real-time data, such as Earthquake and Water and information needed for public health and safety will be updated with limited support. Additionally, USGS will not be able to respond to inquiries until appropriations are enacted.  For more information, please see www.doi.gov/shutdown

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Northeast

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One of the major strengths of the Northeast Area is the enthusiasm and commitment of our scientists to produce the type of high quality science that the USGS is known for. Working together with our partners across the nation, we have the ability to provide complete, integrated and holistic environmental information that will produce the best results that we can achieve.

Filter Total Items: 143
Hurricane Sandy storm surge map
Date Published: April 18, 2016
Status: Active

Hurricane Sandy Surge and Marsh Dieback in the New Jersey Coastal Zone

Detection of storm surge impacts on coastal marshes requires regional or broader mapping of surge flooding above and below the wetland canopy and estimation of abnormal change in wetland condition.

Contacts: Amina Rangoonwala, Elijah Ramsey , III, Ph.D., Nicholas Enright
Flooded Pier at Assawoman Bay, MD
Date Published: April 14, 2016

Flood Science- Northeast Region Capability Team

One of the critical roles that USGS personnel play in their day-to-day activities is to respond in a timely and professional manner to floods that can occur at any time of the year and for a variety of reasons. The Flood Science Capability Team examines the cause and effect...

homes damaged by hurricane Sandy on Fire Island, New York
Date Published: April 13, 2016

Understanding Coastal Change

Scientists perform a range of studies that document, assess, and model coastal change, risk, and vulnerability. Studies include historical shoreline change, the geologic structure and history of coastal regions, sediment supply and transport, sea-level rise, and how extreme storm events affect rates and impacts of coastal change.

Devastation of the coastal city of Banda Aceh, Indonesia, after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami.
Date Published: April 13, 2016

Geologic Hazards and Catastrophic Events

We study the distribution and hazard potential of coastal and submarine events such as earthquakes and submarine landslides and associated tsunami potential, hurricane induced coastal inundation, extreme storms, sea-level rise and oil and gas spills. We also model development to help evaluate and forecast coastal hazard probability and occurrence.

Methane hydrate
Date Published: April 13, 2016

Ocean Resources for America's Needs

Our scientists conduct research studies focused on geologic mapping, sampling and understanding of mineral and energy resources and studies of the geologic setting and processes to inform renewable energy development offshore.

crustose coralline algae
Date Published: April 13, 2016

Coastal and Marine Ecosystem Science

We bring together multidisciplinary expertise focused on developing tools and models to improve understanding of how healthy ecosystems function as well as how they respond to environmental changes and human impacts including ecosystem restoration. Research studies address coral reef, coastal wetland, benthic habitat and groundwater resources.

Figure 1. Jamaica Bay and field sampling sites
Date Published: April 8, 2016

Predicting the Long-Term Impact of Hurricane Sandy on Spatial Patterns of Wetland Morphology in Salt Marshes of Jamaica Bay, New York

USGS scientists are working with collaborators to understand how Hurricane Sandy impacted wetlands in Jamaica Bay, New York. 

BGN logo
Date Published: April 7, 2016

U.S. Board on Geographic Names (BGN)

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is the Federal standard for geographic names. The U.S. Geological Survey developed the GNIS in support of the U.S. Board on Geographic Names as the official repository of domestic geographic names for the Federal Government, and the source for applying geographic names to Federal electronic and printed products.

USGS science for a changing world logo
Date Published: March 8, 2016

Hurricane Sandy

Over 160 of our scientists, technicians, and specialists responded to Hurricane Sandy by deploying field equipment and capturing information both before and after the storm. Our Sandy Science Plan identifies major research themes that will guide research to continue the support of the recovery activities.

Scientist collects samples from a temporary wooden platform in a New Jersey salt marsh
Date Published: August 19, 2014

Estuarine Physical Response to Storms

The Estuarine Physical Response to Storms Project will assess the estuarine and adjacent wetland  responses of three Atlantic lagoonal estuaries to major storm events such as Hurricane Sandy. The estuarine systems include the Barnegat Bay-Little Egg Harbor Estuary, the Chincoteague Bay, and Jamaica Bay, NY. Evaluations of sediment transport, geomorphic change, circulation, wetland stability....

Chesapake Bay Watershed Satellite Image.
Date Published: June 22, 2007

River Input Monitoring

The objective of this study is to provide concentrations and estimates of loads and trends of suspended solids, nitrogen, phosphorus, and other selected constituents at the James, Rappahannock, Appomattox, Pamunkey, and Mattaponi Rivers.

Contacts: Douglas L Moyer
Filter Total Items: 184
Image shows a sample of peat against a rock background
December 31, 2013

Peat

Peat is the precursor to coal. It's made up of decayed plant materials or other organic matter that, over time, can undergo heat and pressure to become lignite. Read more about our coal resources here: https://energy.usgs.gov/Coal/AssessmentsandData/CoalAssessments.aspx

Image shows a sample of peacock coal against a rock background
December 31, 2013

Peacock Coal

This sample is of peacock coal. Peacock coal is not a specific class of coal, but rather the name for an effect in which oxidizing materials in the coal create a dazzling array of colors on the surface of the coal. Usually it is short-lived, as the material fully oxidizes away shortly after exposed to air. Read more about our coal research here: 

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Image shows a sample of anthracite coal on a rock backdrop
December 31, 2013

Anthracite Coal

This is anthracite, the highest rank of coal. It is a hard, brittle, and black lustrous coal, often referred to as hard coal, containing a high percentage of fixed carbon and a low percentage of volatile matter. Anthracite is not as commonly mined as other ranks of coal. It played a significant role in Pennsylvania coal during the Industrial Revolution in the United

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Image shows a sample of anthracite coal on a rock backdrop
December 31, 2013

Anthracite Coal

This is anthracite, the highest rank of coal. It is a hard, brittle, and black lustrous coal, often referred to as hard coal, containing a high percentage of fixed carbon and a low percentage of volatile matter. Anthracite is not as commonly mined as other ranks of coal. It played a significant role in Pennsylvania coal during the Industrial Revolution in the United

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Image shows a sample of clinker on a rock background
December 31, 2013

Clinker Coal

Clinker coal is the result of a seam of coal catching fire and burning so hot that it baked surrounding rock layers into brick-like formations. Some of the most famous clinker formations in the United States can be seen at the Theodore Roosevel National Park in North Dakota. Read more about our

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Image shows a sample of cannel coal on a rock background
December 31, 2013

Cannel Coal

Cannel coal is a type of bituminous coal that is also sometimes referred to as a type of oil shale. It's name likely came from the word "candle." Cannel coal was once used as a source for kerosene. Read more about our coal research here: 

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Image shows a sample of clinker on a rock background
December 31, 2013

Clinker Coal

Clinker coal is the result of a seam of coal catching fire and burning so hot that it baked surrounding rock layers into brick-like formations. Some of the most famous clinker formations in the United States can be seen at the Theodore Roosevel National Park in North Dakota. Read more about our

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Image shows a sample of lignite on a rock background
December 31, 2013

Lignite Coal

A sample of lignite, the lowest rank of coal. It is primarily mined for burning in steam-generation power plants. Read more about our coal research here: https://energy.usgs.gov/Coal/AssessmentsandData/CoalAssessments.aspx

Image shows a sample of lignite on a rock background
December 31, 2013

Lignite Coal

A sample of lignite, the lowest rank of coal. It is primarily mined for burning in steam-generation power plants. Read more about our coal research here: https://energy.usgs.gov/Coal/AssessmentsandData/CoalAssessments.aspx

Water in a Mountain Stream in Nelson County Virginia
November 29, 2013

Water in a Mountain Stream in Nelson County Virginia

Water in a Mountain Stream in Nelson County Virginia

woman surveying high water mark next to Statue of Liberty
January 17, 2013

Surveying a high-water mark on Liberty Island, after Hurricane Sandy

USGS hydrologic technician Amy Simonson surveying a high-water mark on Liberty Island, New York after Hurricane Sandy

Filter Total Items: 135