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Our scientists in the Northwest Region conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens of the Northwest states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.

Filter Total Items: 134
USGS geologist Mary Hodges
Date Published: September 20, 2017
Status: Completed

Geophyical Logging and Water-Quality Assessment for Project Hot Spot

Relatively little is known about the Yellowstone-Snake River "hotspot" system. To increase our knowledge, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technologies Program provided over $4.5 million of this $6.7 million project using American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds.

Contacts: Brian V Twining
Core samples from Idaho National Laboratory
Date Published: September 20, 2017
Status: Completed

Hydrologic Investigations near the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Facility

The U.S. Department of Energy has proposed a location for a new facility to store waste at the INL. In the unlikely event that waste leaks from the facility, it will be important to monitor whether the contamination reaches the aquifer and baseline information is need before the facility is built.

Because we need to know how water and contaminants may travel through the aquifer, we need...

Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Laboratory
Date Published: September 20, 2017
Status: Completed

Naval Reactors Facility Groundwater-Quality Monitoring

As part of the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act, it is important to evaluate the effect of Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) activities on the water quality of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer.

Contacts: Gordon Rattray
Sampling for Bsal
Date Published: September 20, 2017
Status: Active

FRESC Amphibian Research Team

The Amphibian Research Lab focuses on amphibian conservation issues. We are currently addressing issues such as invasive species, disease, land use change, and long-term monitoring design for amphibians in North America. We use a combination of comparative surveys and manipulative experiments to understand the factors affecting amphibian distribution and abundance.

Grizzly bear in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem
Date Published: September 19, 2017
Status: Active

NOROCK Large Carnivore Research Program

NOROCK has substantial expertise in large carnivore research, primarily involving species listed as Threatened or Endangered.  NOROCK’s Large Carnivore Research Program includes scientists from NOROCK’s Headquarters, West Glacier Field Station, and the Southern Appalachian Field Station.  Studies are conducted in a wide variety of landscapes throughout the U.S., as well as international...

Hailey, Idaho
Date Published: September 19, 2017
Status: Active

Wood River Valley Groundwater-Flow Model

Rapid population growth in the Wood River Valley since the 1970s has caused concern about the long-term sustainability of the groundwater resource. Water-resource planners and managers, as well as other decision makers, need a tool for water rights administration and water-resource management and planning.

Glacial fed alpine stream in Glacier National Park.
Date Published: September 13, 2017
Status: Active

Science in Glacier National Park

Glacier National Park (GNP) is considered a stronghold for a large diversity of plant and animal species and harbors some of the last remaining populations of threatened and endangered species such as grizzly bear and bull trout, as well as non threatened keystone species such as bighorn sheep and black bear. The mountain ecosystems of GNP that support these species are dynamic and influenced...

Hydrologist measuring groundwater level
Date Published: August 30, 2017
Status: Active

Upper Klamath Basin Groundwater Studies

Since the late 1990s the USGS has worked to characterize the regional groundwater hydrology of the upper Klamath Basin. Research focuses on collecting data to help evaluate the state of the groundwater system and its response to external stresses, and to develop computer models to provide insights useful for water management. These efforts build on earlier USGS studies in the basin going back...

Wood River, Oregon
Date Published: August 29, 2017
Status: Active

Upper Klamath Basin Studies

In 1992, the USGS began studying possible causes for the change in trophic status of Upper Klamath Lake. Since then research has expanded to include groundwater, geomorphology, streamflow forecasting, and fish ecology.

Boise River near Middleton, Idaho
Date Published: August 18, 2017
Status: Active

Monitoring Mercury in Fish Tissue, Boise and Snake Rivers and Brownlee Reservoir

To meet National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permitting requirements, the City of Boise will be responsible for collecting fish tissue samples for mercury analysis upstream of and downstream of their wastewater treatment facilities discharging to the lower Boise and Snake Rivers.

Mercury is a naturally occurring element that ultimately makes its way into aquatic...

Contacts: Dorene MacCoy
USGS streamgage
Date Published: August 10, 2017
Status: Active

Groundwater-Flow Model for the Treasure Valley and Surrounding Area

in partnership with the Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR) and Idaho Water Resource Board (IWRB), we will construct a numerical groundwater-flow model of the Treasure Valley and surrounding area. Resource managers will use the model to simulate potential anthropogenic and climatic effects on groundwater for water-supply planning and management. As part of model construction, the...

USGS biologist with rainbow trout from the Big Wood River, Idaho
Date Published: August 8, 2017
Status: Active

Wood River Valley Aquatic Biology and Habitat Assessment

Blaine County’s population nearly quadrupled from about 5,700 to 22,000 people between 1970 and 2010. Residents and resource managers of the Wood River Valley of south-central Idaho are concerned about the potential effects that population growth and the expected increased demand for water might have on the quantity and quality of the valley’s ground and surface waters. Increased water use has...

Contacts: Dorene MacCoy

Our scientists in the Northwest Region conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens of the Northwest states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.

Filter Total Items: 335
Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler
January 9, 2017

Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler

A U.S. Geological Survey field crew uses an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler to measure water velocity on the Truckee River in Reno, Nevada.

Closed canopy plantation
December 31, 2016

Closed Canopy Plantation

Example of a closed canopy plantation logged 60 years ago at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest in Oregon, old growth forests have bigger trees and a more complex understory.

Alaska Interior mountain range shot with snow capped mountains.
December 31, 2016

Alaska Interior Mountain Range

Alaska Interior mountain range shot with snow capped mountains. 

USGS employees and Flathead National Forest staff dig pits in the snow to examine snow structure and depth in Montana.
December 31, 2016

USGS employees and Flathead National Forest staff dig pits in the snow

USGS employees and Flathead National Forest staff dig pits in the snow to examine snow structure and depth for avalanche research and forecasting in northwest Montana.

The Garden Wall weather station in Glacier National Park (elev. 7400 feet) is used for avalanche research and forecasting.
December 31, 2016

The Garden Wall weather station in Glacier National Park (elev. 7400)

The Garden Wall weather station in Glacier National Park (elev. 7400 feet) is used for avalanche research and forecasting along the Going-to-the-Sun Road. It records air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, and incoming and outgoing shortwave and longwave radiation.

USGS staff ski to and from  the Garden Wall weather station in Glacier National Park (elev. 7400 feet).
December 31, 2016

USGS staff ski to and from the Garden Wall weather station.

USGS staff ski to and from  the Garden Wall weather station in Glacier National Park (elev. 7400 feet) to complete maintenance and examine the snowpack for avalanche research.

Hikers in Glacier National Park use the new USGS ScienceCache geocaching mobile application.
December 31, 2016

Hikers using ScienceCache

Hikers in Glacier National Park use the new USGS ScienceCache geocaching mobile application. This scientific geocaching mobile application framework consists of a website and app to help engage geo-cachers, youth, and scientists in citizen science.

Girls points to a location on a map laying on the ground.
December 31, 2016

GeoGirls learn about the eruption of Mount St. Helens

GeoGirls learn about how the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens impacted the ecology of the area.

December 31, 2016

Caddisflies in an Artificial Stream

 

Sometimes the whole is actually *less* than the sum of its parts. In this case, it turns out that cadmium and zinc, when combined in ratios like you'd see in the environment, they are actually less toxic to aquatic insects than adding up their individual toxicities. Read more:

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Recording information during a point count
December 31, 2016

Recording Information During a Point Count

Sarah Frey, a Northwest Climate Science Center graduate fellow at Oregon State University, records information during a point count at the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest in Oregon.

Group of students and scientists stand in semi circle with mountain in the background.
December 31, 2016

GeoGirls hike onto the Pumice Plain and learn about Mount St. Helens

GeoGirls hike onto the Pumice Plain to learn more about Mount St. Helens’ historical

eruptions.

Three girls sit on rocks and look at a computer screen.
December 31, 2016

Geogirls use computers in the field to track locations

Geogirls use computers in the field to track locations and annotate field photos.

Our scientists in the Northwest Region conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens of the Northwest states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.

Filter Total Items: 86
Flooding in the Western Swinomish Reservation
June 12, 2017

For the Swinomish people of northwestern Washington, water is life. But this symbiotic relationship between man and nature has been disrupted, and increasingly threatened, by sea-level rise and changes in Northwestern storm and rainfall patterns.

Image shows remnants of an abandoned mine in a hilly, forested area
June 9, 2017

At USGS, although the rocks we study are millions of years old, our scientific methods are cutting edge! Here's just one example of how we use creative problem-solving to help crystalize a solution to a complex issue.

Illustration of Fijian Gau iguanas.
June 6, 2017

Researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey, Taronga Conservation Society Australia, The National Trust of Fiji and NatureFiji-MareqetiViti have discovered a new species of banded iguana.

Image shows several insets against the backdrop of Mount St. Helens erupting
May 18, 2017

Today, in 1980, Mount St. Helens unleashed the most devastating eruption in U.S. history. Two years later, USGS founded the Cascades Volcano Observatory to monitor Mount St. Helens and all the Cascades Volcanoes.

2014 South Napa Earthquake in California
May 15, 2017

Early on the morning of August 24, 2014, Loren Turner was awoken by clattering window blinds, a moving bed, and the sound of water splashing out of his backyard pool. He experienced what is now named the “South Napa Earthquake.” 

Image shows a scan of an apatite grain on a black background
May 11, 2017

No one wants to have an active volcano in their backyard (just ask Dionisio Pulido), but ancient eroded volcanoes can sometimes be literal goldmines for mineral ores.

This image shows the perimeter of Sperry Glacier in Glacier National Park in 1966,1998, 2005, and 2015.
May 10, 2017

The warming climate has dramatically reduced the size of 39 glaciers in Montana since 1966, some by as much as 85 percent, according to data released by the U.S. Geological Survey and Portland State University.

Midnight Rainbow at Atigun Gorge, Alaska
April 10, 2017

Managing 72 million acres of Federal lands in Alaska is not easy, especially when the land’s many uses need to be balanced. There are several competing interests, including the development of mineral resources that are critical to the American economy.

BART
April 6, 2017

Although no one can reliably predict earthquakes, today’s technology is advanced enough to rapidly detect seismic waves as an earthquake begins, calculate the maximum expected shaking, and send alerts to surrounding areas before damage can occur. This technology is known as “earthquake early warning” (EEW).

Earthquake Early Warning: Vital for City Transit
April 6, 2017

The U.S. Geological Survey along with university, state and private-sector partners will highlight the rollout of Version 1.2 of the USGS ShakeAlert earthquake early warning system on April 10, 2017.

Image shows a scan of a grain of pyrite rimmed with stibnite, with varying levels of arsenic shown in a color gradient. Image pr
April 6, 2017

Today’s high-end electronics increasingly rely on mineral commodities...and research into those mineral commodities is increasingly using high-end electronics too!

bue and white street sign, circle with wave -shaped drawing indicating a tsunami evacuation route
March 20, 2017

Hours before Japan was struck by the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and the ensuing catastrophic tsunami, John Schelling spoke at a public meeting in the coastal community of Oceans Shores, Washington, about preparing for tsunami hazards. The few dozen people attending the meeting went home that evening and watched in horror as the events in Japan unfolded.

Our scientists in the Northwest Region conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens of the Northwest states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.

Our scientists in the Northwest Region conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens of the Northwest states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.

Filter Total Items: 55