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Our scientists in the Northwest Region conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens of the Northwest states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.

Filter Total Items: 134
ScienceCache screen shot.
Date Published: June 27, 2016

ScienceCache

Working with the Northern Rockies Science Center, the Information Science Branch designed and developed ScienceCache, a scientific geocaching mobile application framework. Initially developed for citizen science data collection, the application was extended to work for any field data collection effort. The lead researcher controls the data collection route, collection forms, and data...

Contacts: Tim Kern
Boreal toad (Bufo boreas) mating ball, Bridger-Teton National Forest, Wyoming.
Date Published: May 6, 2016

Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative: Rocky Mountain Region

The Rocky Mountain Region of Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI) encompasses Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, and New Mexico. Two USGS Science Centers initiate and develop ARMI projects in this region. Investigations at NOROCK are headed by Dr. Blake Hossack. Investigations at the Fort Collins Science Center (FORT), Colorado, are headed by Dr. Erin Muths. The ARMI program is based...

Contacts: Blake Hossack
Image: Garden Wall Weather Station, MT
Date Published: May 5, 2016

Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems (CCME)

Climate change is widely acknowledged to be having a profound effect on the biosphere with many and diverse impacts on global resources. Mountain ecosystems in the western U.S. and the Northern Rockies in particular are highly sensitive to climate change. In fact, the higher elevations of the Northern Rockies have experienced three times the global average temperature increase over the past...

USGS scientists collecting a water sample from a well at the USGS Bemidji Research Site
Date Published: April 19, 2016

Crude Oil Contamination in the Shallow Subsurface

This investigation focuses on the long-term persistence in soils and groundwater of petroleum hydrocarbon spills, including crude oil and refined petroleum fuels. The study site near Bemidji, MN, is a laboratory for developing site assessment tools and understanding chemical changes affecting human and environmental health that occur during natural attenuation of petroleum hydrocarbons.

The National Map
Date Published: April 19, 2016

National Geospatial Program User Engagement Office

Would you like to learn more about USGS National Map products and services? Then welcome to the National Geospatial Program User Engagement office. We can help you leverage NGP products and services through The National Map and other venues. Connect with us through our network of National Map Liaisons. There's a liaison for every state!

American pika.
Date Published: April 13, 2016
Status: Active

Extinction dynamics and microrefugia of the American pika as climate changes.

Accurate projections of climate change and associated impacts on wildlife are now essential to conservation planning, but predictive models of range shifts for many species are often coarse, ignore extinction dynamics, and overestimate suitable habitat. Recent studies suggest the American pika (Ochotona princeps) is vulnerable to increasing heat stress in the Great Basin yet appears more...

Contacts: Aaron Johnston
homes damaged by hurricane Sandy on Fire Island, New York
Date Published: April 13, 2016

Understanding Coastal Change

Scientists perform a range of studies that document, assess, and model coastal change, risk, and vulnerability. Studies include historical shoreline change, the geologic structure and history of coastal regions, sediment supply and transport, sea-level rise, and how extreme storm events affect rates and impacts of coastal change.

Devastation of the coastal city of Banda Aceh, Indonesia, after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami.
Date Published: April 13, 2016

Geologic Hazards and Catastrophic Events

We study the distribution and hazard potential of coastal and submarine events such as earthquakes and submarine landslides and associated tsunami potential, hurricane induced coastal inundation, extreme storms, sea-level rise and oil and gas spills. We also model development to help evaluate and forecast coastal hazard probability and occurrence.

Methane hydrate
Date Published: April 13, 2016

Ocean Resources for America's Needs

Our scientists conduct research studies focused on geologic mapping, sampling and understanding of mineral and energy resources and studies of the geologic setting and processes to inform renewable energy development offshore.

crustose coralline algae
Date Published: April 13, 2016

Coastal and Marine Ecosystem Science

We bring together multidisciplinary expertise focused on developing tools and models to improve understanding of how healthy ecosystems function as well as how they respond to environmental changes and human impacts including ecosystem restoration. Research studies address coral reef, coastal wetland, benthic habitat and groundwater resources.

A female grizzly with a cub.  Adult females are considered the most important segment of the grizzly population and consequently
Date Published: April 12, 2016

Grizzly Bear Dispersal

This work has two components. First, we developed a method to use our family tree data to examine dispersal. Next, we would like to apply this method to our updated and more complete family tree to improve our understanding of how grizzly bears disperse.

Contacts: Tabitha Graves
Huckleberries are central to the diets of bears, grouse, and other animals, as well as being a cultural and food resource.
Date Published: April 12, 2016

Predicting changes in Bear Foods

Huckleberries are central to the diets of bears, grouse, and other animals, as well as being a cultural and food resource for humans. Approximately 15% of the diet of bears in the Whitefish range and Glacier National Park is huckleberries, and huckleberries help bears gain weight for hibernation. Changes in climate lead to changes in vegetation phenology, productivity, and quality that may...

Contacts: Tabitha Graves

Our scientists in the Northwest Region conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens of the Northwest states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.

Filter Total Items: 335
July 25, 2016

D2 East Transect – 2016

Permanent Site: D2 East Transect; Depth: 11.9 Meters (38.9 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 0.3 Kilometers (0.2 Miles); Pre/Post Dam Removal: 5 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.15233001,-123.56829403; Site Description: This site is right off the mouth of the river and is actively being buried in sandy substrate. The sediment for the first 19 meters of the 30 meter

...
July 18, 2016

Inside USGS, No. 6, Ken Pierce, Heavy Breathing of Yellowstone Caldera

Dr. Kenneth Pierce studied the geology and geomorphology of the greater Yellowstone area for nearly his entire career with the U.S. Geological Survey. From 1965 to present, Dr. Pierce has mapped glacial deposits, pioneered Quaternary dating techniques, conducted research on the Yellowstone Hot Spot, studied the geothermal areas, explored the geology of archaeological sites

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July 18, 2016

Inside USGS, No. 5, Pleistocene Glaciations of Greater Yellowstone

Dr. Kenneth Pierce studied the geology and geomorphology of the greater Yellowstone area for nearly his entire career with the U.S. Geological Survey. From 1965 to present, Dr. Pierce has mapped glacial deposits, pioneered Quaternary dating techniques, conducted research on the Yellowstone Hot Spot, studied the geothermal areas, explored the geology of archaeological sites

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An American bullfrog.
June 30, 2016

American bullfrog close-up

An American bullfrom is native to most eastern states, but considered invasive in the moutain west.

Photo of a red dye-tracer study in June 2016 on the Missouri River near Fort Peck Dam, Montana.
June 26, 2016

Red dye-tracer study in June 2016 on the Missouri River in Montana

USGS scientists conducted a dye-tracer study in June 2016 on the Missouri River about 10 miles downstream of Fort Peck Dam, Montana. The public can expect to see the Yellowstone River turn a similar color in the vicinity of the injection site when scientists conduct a dye study near Glendive, Montana in late June, 2017.

June 15, 2016

Catching the Quakes

USGS Research Geophysicist Kate Allstadt conducts experiments at the U.S. Geological Survey debris-flow flume, near Eugene, Oregon. Dr. Allstadt and her group are working toward an understanding of how debris flows generate seismic signals. The quantitative information will be used in the development of improved technologies for detecting debris flows to mitigate their

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May 25, 2016

What's the Big Idea?—Multiple Perspectives to Answer Complex Questions

JoAnn Holloway, biogeochemist with the USGS Mineral Resources Program, explains how interdisciplinary science can help better inform the conditions of a complex ecosystem.

Cattle Grazing at Sunset in Montana
April 25, 2016

Cattle Grazing at Sunset in Montana

Cattle graze on a ranch in western Montana.

A USGS scientist skis in to Dead Horse Point on Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier NP.
April 6, 2016

Dead Horse Point

A USGS scientist skis in to Dead Horse Point on Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier NP.

Avalanche forecasters ski out to investigate the crown of a large wet slab avalanche in Haystack Creek drainage. This drainage i
April 5, 2016

Haystack Creek avalanche

Avalanche forecasters ski out to investigate the crown of a large wet slab avalanche in Haystack Creek drainage. This drainage is one of the largest avalanche paths affecting the Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park.  

Hermit warbler
March 23, 2016

Hermit Warbler

Black-throated green warbler at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest in Oregon.

Our scientists in the Northwest Region conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens of the Northwest states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.

Filter Total Items: 86
 Losing a Legacy: A photographic story of disappearing glaciers
April 7, 2016

What began as an effort to document and analyze the retreat of glaciers in Glacier National Park, has become a collection of striking photographs displayed on museum walls.

USGS
April 4, 2016

Water managers in eastern Washington now have access to the first U.S. Geological Survey computer model of the East Pasco Basin, allowing them to simulate “what-if” groundwater management scenarios, according to a USGS report.

Bat hanging from a cave ceiling
March 31, 2016

OLYMPIA, Wash. – White-nose syndrome (WNS) has been confirmed in a little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) found near North Bend – the first recorded occurrence of this devastating bat disease in western North America. The presence of this disease was verified by the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center

Image: High Water Measurements at USGS Site 11059300
March 4, 2016

El Niño is a phenomenon that occurs when unusually warm ocean water piles up along the equatorial west coast of South America. When this phenomenon develops, it affects weather patterns around the globe, including the winter weather along the west coast of North America. This unusual pattern of sea surface temperatures occurs in irregular cycles about three to seven years apart.

Image: Water-Quality Study in Historical Idaho Mining District
December 9, 2015

The U.S. Geological Survey today published results of a three-year water-quality study in the historical Stibnite Mining District of central Idaho. The study was commissioned by Midas Gold and the Idaho Department of Lands.

USGS science for a changing world logo
November 9, 2015

According to new U.S. Geological Survey research springs and marshes in the desert outside Las Vegas expanded and contracted dramatically in response to past episodes of abrupt climate change, even disappearing altogether for centuries at a time when conditions became too warm.

Image: Wyoming Big Sagebrush Community Near Winnemucca, Nevada
October 26, 2015

CORVALLIS, Ore. — Heightened interest in advancing sage-grouse conservation has increased the importance of sagebrush-steppe restoration to recover or create wildlife habitat conditions that meet the species’ needs.

Image: A Rainbow Trout Rests Among Substrate in Panther Creek
October 26, 2015

Infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) is an infectious viral disease of salmon and trout.

USGS
October 21, 2015

Scientists built upon a recently completed groundwater model of the Yakima River Basin to create a computer simulation that tracks well water back to its likely source area.

Aurora silently illuminates a barren and frozen world of mountains, a schooner locked in sea ice, and a man witha dog-drawn sled
September 30, 2015

USGS explores the meaning behind Frederic Edwin Church's 1865 painting, “Aurora Borealis.”

USGS scientists prepare to launch the Raven-A sUAS at the start of civil twilight. Credit: USGS Fort Collins Science Center
September 14, 2015

The term crepuscular describes events relating to, resembling, or occurring during twilight, meaning morning and evening hours. An animal described as crepuscular is active during twilight.

USGS
September 10, 2015

Tonight, the Tilikum Crossing, Bridge of the People, will brighten Portland’s skyline when the bridge’s aesthetic nighttime light program is permanently switched on.

Our scientists in the Northwest Region conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens of the Northwest states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.