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Our scientists in the Northwest Region conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens of the Northwest states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.

Filter Total Items: 134
Grizzly family tree.
Date Published: April 12, 2016

Grizzly Bear Family Tree

Building a family tree of grizzly bears can both satisfy our natural curiosity about bear society and answer many ecologically important questions about the ways bears interact with each other and the landscape.

Contacts: Tabitha Graves
Black Bear and Cub in Montana
Date Published: April 12, 2016

Joe Clark's Research

This is a summary of the research focus for Dr. Joe Clark.

Contacts: Joseph Clark
Yellowstone stream temperature sampling.
Date Published: April 12, 2016

Developing stream temperature networks for the Greater Yellowstone to aid in managing aquatic resources under a changing climate

The topographic diversity and extensive area of protected public land within the Greater Yellowstone demonstrate the importance of this region as a natural resource reserve. Understanding the effects of anticipated changes in climate on aquatic resources and means for managing these resources will ultimately require accurate linkages between empirical data and regional climatic patterns. This...

Muddy forest road.
Date Published: April 12, 2016

Improving our understanding of forest-road effects on substrate in headwater streams of the Southwest Crown of the Continent

In 2010, Congress established ten decade-long Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program projects to carry out fuel reduction and ecological restoration treatments on public lands across the country. The Southwest Crown of the Continent was selected as one of the locations under this initiative, given the importance of this region to the economic vitality of local communities and the...

Inserting telemetry devise on a fish.
Date Published: April 12, 2016

Evaluating the linkages between regional climate patterns, local climate data, and native Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri) and non-native brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) growth, survival, and life-history expressions.

Beyond large-scale climate models, it is becoming increasingly important to quantify how regional climate patterns link with in situ stream temperatures and hydrologic regimes and concomitantly, fish behavior, growth, and survival. Here, we are using comprehensive mark-recapture techniques to evaluate how changing climatic conditions are likely to influence native westslope cutthroat trout and...

Image of Lahontan cutthroat trout.
Date Published: April 12, 2016

Food web and Pyramid Lake fishery evaluation

Lahontan cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii henshawi) is an important cultural and economic resource to the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe and a Threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. Here we are integrating the food web information with field estimates of Lahontan cutthroat vital rate and growth information to guide future management and recovery efforts within Pyramid Lake and...

Native westslope cutthroat trout swim in the north fork of the Flathead River in northwestern Montana.
Date Published: April 12, 2016

Forecasting the effects of climate change on the interactions of native and non-native salmonids

Changes in temperature and precipitation patterns under global climate change are expected to expand the range of suitable habitat for non-natives within stream networks, resulting in significant increases in the distribution and abundance of non-natives. However, our understanding of how landscape attributes can affect local thermal and hydrologic patterns suggests that changes in global...

Westslope cutthroat trout and bull trout in the North Fork of the Flathead River, Montana.
Date Published: April 12, 2016

Evaluating the reintroduction potential and limiting factors associated with anadromous fish reintroductions in the Upper Lewis River, WA

Hydropower facilities on the Lewis River, WA eliminated historic runs of anadromous species to the headwaters of the Lewis River. As anadromous reintroductions are considered and implemented, there remains considerable uncertainty in the viability of reintroductions in reservoir and tributary systems where large populations of non-native species persist and where spawning and rearing habitat...

Thomas Creek in Ruby Mountains.
Date Published: April 11, 2016

Design, Analysis, Monitoring, and Conservation of Ecological Dynamics at Broad Scales

There is increasing recognition that the spatial context in which any ecological process or phenomenon occurs has great bearing on the outcome of that process.  Since 1994, we have been working on numerous field investigations and conceptual developments to inform how ecological resources can be managed and conserved across jurisdictional boundaries and broad spatial extents.  Because such...

Cattle grazing in the mountain sunset.
Date Published: April 11, 2016

Grazing, Ungulate, and Disturbance Ecology

We work with a diverse collection of other researchers and resource managers, at local to national and international levels, to address ways in which herbivory and grazing systems interact with the broader ecosystems in which they occur.  We investigate whether long-term weather patterns may interact synergistically to affect how soils, vegetation, and other animals respond to grazing or...

American pika eating plants.
Date Published: April 11, 2016

Species and Ecosystem Responses to Global Change

We work with a diverse collection of researchers, resource managers, and conservation practitioners to address the “how” and “why” questions that underlie species-and ecosystem-level responses to long-term weather patterns.  Although it is more challenging, this level of more-mechanistic understanding is critical for informing climate-adaptation actions and strategies.  We use a diversity of...

Bighorn sheep in Glacier NP.
Date Published: April 10, 2016

Bighorn Sheep in and near Glacier National Park

USGS collected GPS data as well as genetic and other samples on over 100 bighorn sheep east of the Continental Divide in Glacier National Park, Waterton National Park, and the Blackfeet Reservation. Bighorn sheep across the west are vulnerable to disease such as pneumonia. We are therefore working to improve our understanding of bighorn sheep movements, approaches for monitoring bighorns, and...

Contacts: Tabitha Graves

Our scientists in the Northwest Region conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens of the Northwest states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.

Filter Total Items: 335
Black-throated gray warbler
March 23, 2016

Black-throated Gray Warbler

Black-throated gray warbler at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest in Oregon.

Old growth forest
March 23, 2016

Old Growth Forest

Old growth forest at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest in Oregon, old growth forests have bigger trees and a more complex understory.

March 15, 2016

Mange in Wolves of Yellowstone National Park

This video describes USGS research utilizing remote thermal imaging cameras to study the extent and impact of mange on wolves in Yellowstone National Park.

February 25, 2016

Whitebark pine cone and seeds.

Image of whitebark pine cone and seeds.

Grizzly released from trap
February 23, 2016

Grizzly released from trap

After the grizzly bear recovers fully from the anesthesia, it is released back into the wilderness.  

February 23, 2016

Telemetry by air

Once a grizzly bear is radio collared, biologists can track its movements with telemetry via airplane.  The IGBST also used the latest telemetry technologies, which allows downloading of GPS data from the radio collar via satellites.

February 23, 2016

Telemetry by foot

Once a grizzly bear is radio collared, biologists can track its movements with telemetry on foot.   

February 23, 2016

Culvert trap

Biologists place a culvert trap in locations that they need data from.  Field crews will set up the culvert trap and check it daily, usually in the morning, to determine if a bear has been captured.  Additionally, trap doors are checked via radio telemetry. 

February 23, 2016

Culvert trap and bait

Biologists use road-killed ungulates such as deer, elk, or bison as bait in the traps. 

February 23, 2016

At the capture site

At capture sites with road access, biologists drive to a trap with a bear inside to set up for collecting biological data. 

February 23, 2016

Ready to remove from the trap

Biologists have immobilized the bear and prepare to lift it out of the trap and onto the tarp for data collection.  Once on the tarp the bear is easier to move. 

February 23, 2016

Preparing for collection of samples

A biologist prepares to collect biological information from the bear they have captured.  Biologists collect hair samples for genetic analysis, weigh the bear,  and gather numerous measurements of the body, such as the head, paws, claws, teeth, etc.  Overall condition of the bear is assessed as well, including a body fat measurement.

Our scientists in the Northwest Region conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens of the Northwest states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.

Filter Total Items: 86
USGS
September 9, 2015

Climate change has a direct and evident impact on Native American tribal communities by disrupting local economies and traditional cultures. Members of tribes from across the United States will convene at the University of Idaho’s McCall Field Campus in June 2016 for the first-ever National Tribal Climate Boot Camp.

Image: Seth Moran, USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory
August 17, 2015

The U.S. Geological Survey is pleased to announce the selection of Dr. Seth Moran to serve as the new Scientist-in-Charge of the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory. Moran succeeds John Ewert, who served in the position for the past five years. Moran took the helm on August 9.

Image: Elevation Field Work at Bandon Marsh
August 14, 2015

The U.S. Geological Survey and Oregon State University released a report this week examining Pacific Northwest tidal wetland vulnerability to sea level rise. Scientists found that, while vulnerability varies from marsh to marsh, most wetlands would likely be resilient to rising sea levels over the next 50-70 years.

USGS
July 30, 2015

Twenty middle school girls from Washington and Oregon are participating in “GeoGirls,” an outdoor program jointly organized by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Mount St. Helens Institute.

USGS
July 27, 2015

One winter's night in the year 1700, a mysterious tsunami flooded fields and washed away houses in Japan. It arrived without the warning that a nearby earthquake usually provides.

Image: Ken Berg, USGS Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center Director
May 28, 2015

Ken Berg has been named the new director of the U.S. Geological Survey Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, headquartered in Corvallis, Ore.

3D perspective view of the likelihood that each region of California will experience a magnitude 6.7 within 30 years
March 10, 2015

A new California earthquake forecast by the U.S. Geological Survey and partners revises scientific estimates for the chances of having large earthquakes over the next several decades. 

Image: Vog from Kilauea
February 11, 2015

A new study to examine how people who live downwind of Kīlauea Volcano cope with volcanic gas emissions, or vog, is currently underway.

USGS
December 18, 2014

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell announced today that Interior’s Northwest Climate Science Center is awarding more than one million dollars to universities and other partners for research to guide managers of parks, refuges and other cultural and natural resources in planning how to help species and ecosystems adapt to climate change.

Historical photo of a flood on Willamette River in Oregon from 1964
December 11, 2014

The Christmas flood of 1964 encompassed about 200,000 square miles, or roughly the size of France, resulted in 47 deaths, left thousands homeless and caused more than $540 million ($3.9 billion today) worth of damage.

Image: USGS Scientist Researching  Bakken Formation Water Samples
November 17, 2014

Energy development in the Williston Basin oil production area of Montana and North Dakota, which includes the Bakken and Three Forks Formations, has not affected shallow groundwater quality, according to a recently published study in the journalGroundwater.

Image: Low-level Helicopter Towing a Large Wire-Loop Contraption Hanging from a Cable
October 28, 2014

Citizens should not be alarmed if they see a low-flying helicopter towing a large wire-loop contraption hanging from a cable in the Poplar, Montana area during the next couple of weeks.

Our scientists in the Northwest Region conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens of the Northwest states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.